English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Selfing in haploid plants and efficacy of selection: codon usage bias in the model moss Physcomitrella patens

Szövényi, P., Ullrich, K. K., Rensing, S. A., Lang, D., van Gessel, N., Stenøien, H. K., et al. (2017). Selfing in haploid plants and efficacy of selection: codon usage bias in the model moss Physcomitrella patens. Genome Biology and Evolution, 9(1), 1528-1546. doi:10.1093/gbe/evx098.

Item is

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
evx098.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
evx098.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-

Locators

show
hide
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Szövényi, Péter, Author
Ullrich, Kristian K.1, Author              
Rensing, Stefan A, Author
Lang, Daniel, Author
van Gessel, Nico, Author
Stenøien, Hans K, Author
Conti, Elena, Author
Reski, Ralf, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445635              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: codon usage; moss; effective population size; inbreeding; natural selection; genetic drift
 Abstract: Long term reduction in effective population size will lead to major shift in genome evolution. In particular, when effective population size is small, genetic drift becomes dominant over natural selection. The onset of self-fertilization is one evolutionary event considerably reducing effective size of populations. Theory predicts that this reduction should be more dramatic in organisms capable for haploid than for diploid selfing. Although theoretically well-grounded, this assertion received mixed experimental support. Here we test this hypothesis by analyzing synonymous codon usage bias of genes in the model moss Physcomitrella patens frequently undergoing haploid selfing. In line with population genetic theory, we found that the effect of natural selection on synonymous codon usage bias is very weak. Our conclusion is supported by four independent lines of evidence: a) Very weak or nonsignificant correlation between gene expression and codon usage bias; b) No increased codon usage bias in more broadly expressed genes; c) No evidence that codon usage bias would constrain synonymous and nonsynonymous divergence; d) Predominant role of genetic drift on synonymous codon usage predicted by a model-based analysis. These findings show striking similarity to those observed in AT-rich genomes with weak selection for optimal codon usage and GC content overall. Our finding is in contrast to a previous study reporting adaptive codon usage bias in the moss P. patens.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-12-012017-05-252017-05-262017-06
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/gbe/evx098
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Genome Biology and Evolution
  Other : GBE
  Abbreviation : Genome Biol Evol
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Oxford : Oxford Univ. Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1528 - 1546 Identifier: Other: 1759-6653
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1759-6653