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  Chimpanzees, bonobos and children successfully coordinate in conflict situations

Sanchez-Amaro, A., Duguid, S., Call, J., & Tomasello, M. (2017). Chimpanzees, bonobos and children successfully coordinate in conflict situations. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 284(1856): 20170259. doi:10.1098/rspb.2017.0259.

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 Creators:
Sanchez-Amaro, Alejandro1, 2, Author              
Duguid, Shona1, Author              
Call, Josep1, Author              
Tomasello, Michael1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Developmental and Comparative Psychology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, ou_1497671              
2The Leipzig School of Human Origins (IMPRS), Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Max Planck Society, Deutscher Platz 6, 04103 Leipzig, DE, ou_1497688              

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 Abstract: Social animals need to coordinate with others to reap the benefits of group-living even when individuals' interests are misaligned. We compare how chimpanzees, bonobos and children coordinate their actions with a conspecific in a Snowdrift game, which provides a model for understanding how organisms coordinate and make decisions under conflict. In study 1, we presented pairs of chimpanzees, bonobos and children with an unequal reward distribution. In the critical condition, the preferred reward could only be obtained by waiting for the partner to act, with the risk that if no one acted, both would lose the rewards. Apes and children successfully coordinated to obtain the rewards. Children used a ‘both-partner-pull’ strategy and communicated during the task, while some apes relied on an ‘only-one-partner-pulls' strategy to solve the task, although there were also signs of strategic behaviour as they waited for their partner to pull when that strategy led to the preferred reward. In study 2, we presented pairs of chimpanzees and bonobos with the same set-up as in study 1 with the addition of a non-social option that provided them with a secure reward. In this situation, apes had to actively decide between the unequal distribution and the alternative. In this set-up, apes maximized their rewards by taking their partners' potential actions into account. In conclusion, children and apes showed clear instances of strategic decision-making to maximize their own rewards while maintaining successful coordination.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-06-072017-06-14
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: 9
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2017.0259
 Degree: -

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Title: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
  Abbreviation : Proc. R. Soc. B
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London : Royal Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 284 (1856) Sequence Number: 20170259 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 0962-8452
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/110975500577295_2