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  Coprophagous features in carnivorous Nepenthes plants: a task for ureases

Yilamujiang, A., Zhu, A., Ligabue-Braun, R., Bartram, S., Witte, C.-P., Hedrich, R., et al. (2017). Coprophagous features in carnivorous Nepenthes plants: a task for ureases. Scientific Reports, 7: 11647. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-11999-z.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41598-017-11999-z (Publisher version)
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 Creators:
Yilamujiang, Ayufu1, 2, Author              
Zhu, Anting, Author
Ligabue-Braun, Rodrigo, Author
Bartram, Stefan1, Author              
Witte, Claus-Peter, Author
Hedrich, Rainer, Author
Hasabe, Mitsuyasu, Author
Schöner, Caroline R., Author
Schöner, Michael G., Author
Kerth, Gerald, Author
Carlini, Célia R., Author
Mithöfer, Axel1, 3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Prof. Dr. W. Boland, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, ou_24028              
2IMPRS on Ecological Interactions, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, Jena, DE, ou_421900              
3Research Group Dr. A. Mithöfer, Plant Defense Physiology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Prof. Dr. W. Boland, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, Jena, DE, ou_421907              

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 Abstract: Most terrestrial carnivorous plants are specialized on insect prey digestion to obtain additional nutrients. Few species of the genus Nepenthes developed mutualistic relationships with mammals for nitrogen supplementation. Whether dietary changes require certain enzymatic composition to utilize new sources of nutrients has rarely been tested. Here, we investigated the role of urease for Nepenthes hemsleyana that gains nitrogen from the bat Kerivoula hardwickii while it roosts inside the pitchers. We hypothesized that N. hemsleyana is able to use urea from the bats’ excrements. In fact, we demonstrate that 15N-enriched urea provided to Nepenthes pitchers is metabolized and its nitrogen is distributed within the plant. As ureases are necessary to degrade urea, these hydrolytic enzymes should be involved. We proved the presence and enzymatic activity of a urease for Nepenthes plant tissues. The corresponding urease cDNA from N. hemsleyana was isolated and functionally expressed. A comprehensive phylogenetic analysis for eukaryotic ureases, including Nepenthes and five other carnivorous plants’ taxa, identified them as canonical ureases and reflects the plant phylogeny. Hence, this study reveals ureases as an emblematic example for an efficient, low-cost but high adaptive plasticity in plants while developing a further specialized lifestyle from carnivory to coprophagy.

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 Dates: 2017-08-252017-09-14
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: Other: BOL684
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-11999-z
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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 Sequence Number: 11647 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322