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  Itsy bitsy spider…: Infants react with increased arousal to spiders and snakes

Hoehl, S., Hellmer, K., Johansson, M., & Gredebäck, G. (2017). Itsy bitsy spider…: Infants react with increased arousal to spiders and snakes. Frontiers in Psychology, 8: 1710. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01710.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-EE2B-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-5EAE-1
Genre: Journal Article

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Hoehl_Hellmer_2017.pdf (Publisher version), 941KB
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 Creators:
Hoehl, Stefanie1, 2, Author              
Hellmer, Kahl3, Author
Johansson, Maria3, Author
Gredebäck, Gustaf3, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Early Social Cognition, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2355694              
2Faculty of Psychology, University Vienna, Austria, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, Uppsala University, Sweden, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Infants; Pupillary dilation; Arousal; Fear; Evolution
 Abstract: Attention biases have been reported for ancestral threats like spiders and snakes in infants, children, and adults. However, it is currently unclear whether these stimuli induce increased physiological arousal in infants. Here, 6-month-old infants were presented with pictures of spiders and flowers (Study 1, within-subjects), or snakes and fish (Study 1, within-subjects; Study 2, between-subjects). Infants’ pupillary responses linked to activation of the noradrenergic system were measured. Infants reacted with increased pupillary dilation indicating arousal to spiders and snakes compared with flowers and fish. Results support the notion of an evolved preparedness for developing fear of these ancestral threats.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-07-242017-09-192017-10-18
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01710
PMID: 29093687
PMC: PMC5651927
Other: eCollection 2017
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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 1710 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078