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  Specific contributions of basal ganglia and cerebellum to the neural tracking of rhythm

Nozaradan, S., Schwartze, M., Obermeier, C., & Kotz, S. A. (2017). Specific contributions of basal ganglia and cerebellum to the neural tracking of rhythm. Cortex, 95, 156-168. doi:10.1016/j.cortex.2017.08.015.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-F659-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B367-F
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Nozaradan, Sylvie1, 2, 3, Author
Schwartze, Michael4, 5, Author              
Obermeier, Christian4, Author              
Kotz, Sonja A.4, 5, Author              
Affiliations:
1The MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney, Australia, ou_persistent22              
2Institute of Neuroscience, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium, ou_persistent22              
3International Laboratory for Brain, Music and Sound Research (BRAMS), University of Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
5Basic and Applied NeuroDynamics Lab, Department of Neuropsychology and Psychopharmacology, Maastricht University, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Musical rhythm; Frequency-tagging; EEG; Human brain lesion; Basal ganglia; Cerebellum; Auditory processing
 Abstract: How specific brain networks track rhythmic sensory input over time remains a challenge in neuroimaging work. Here we show that subcortical areas, namely the basal ganglia and the cerebellum, specifically contribute to the neural tracking of rhythm. We tested patients with focal lesions in either of these areas and healthy controls by means of electroencephalography (EEG) while they listened to rhythmic sequences known to induce selective neural tracking at a frequency corresponding to the most-often perceived pulse-like beat. Both patients and controls displayed neural responses to the rhythmic sequences. However, these response patterns were different across groups, with patients showing reduced tracking at beat frequency, especially for the more challenging rhythms. In the cerebellar patients, this effect was specific to the rhythm played at a fast tempo, which places high demands on the temporally precise encoding of events. In contrast, basal ganglia patients showed more heterogeneous responses at beat frequency specifically for the most complex rhythm, which requires more internal generation of the beat. These findings provide electrophysiological evidence that these subcortical structures selectively shape the neural representation of rhythm. Moreover, they suggest that the processing of rhythmic auditory input relies on an extended cortico-subcortico-cortical functional network providing specific timing and entrainment sensitivities.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-07-162017-02-252017-08-072017-08-192017-10
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.cortex.2017.08.015
PMID: 28910668
Other: Epub 2017
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : DE160101064
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Australian Research Council
Project name : -
Grant ID : KO2268/6-1
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)

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Title: Cortex
  Other : Cortex
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Milan [etc.] : Elsevier Masson SAS
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 95 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 156 - 168 Identifier: ISSN: 0010-9452
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925393344