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  Temporally and spatially distinct theta oscillations dissociate a language-specific from a domain-general processing mechanism across the age trajectory

Beese, C., Meyer, L., Vassileiou, B., & Friederici, A. D. (2017). Temporally and spatially distinct theta oscillations dissociate a language-specific from a domain-general processing mechanism across the age trajectory. Scientific Reports, 7: 11202. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-11632-z.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-F6A5-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-5EA2-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Beese, Caroline1, Author              
Meyer, Lars1, Author              
Vassileiou, Benedict1, Author              
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
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1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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 Abstract: The cognitive functionality of neural oscillations is still highly debated, as different functions have been associated with identical frequency ranges. Theta band oscillations, for instance, were proposed to underlie both language comprehension and domain-general cognitive abilities. Here we show that the ageing brain can provide an answer to the open question whether it is one and the same theta oscillation underlying those functions, thereby resolving a long-standing paradox. While better cognitive functioning is predicted by low theta power in the brain at rest, resting state (RS) theta power declines with age, but sentence comprehension deteriorates in old age. We resolve this paradox showing that sentence comprehension declines due to changes in RS theta power within domain-general brain networks known to support successful sentence comprehension, while low RS theta power within the left-hemispheric dorso-frontal language network predicts intact sentence comprehension. The two RS theta networks were also found to functionally decouple relative to their independent internal coupling. Thus, both temporally and spatially distinct RS theta oscillations dissociate a language-specific from a domain-general processing mechanism.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-02-282017-08-292017-09-11
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-11632-z
PMID: 28894235
PMC: PMC5593879
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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 Sequence Number: 11202 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: /journals/resource/2045-2322