English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Don’t get me wrong: ERP evidence from cueing communicative intentions

Regel, S., & Gunter, T. C. (2017). Don’t get me wrong: ERP evidence from cueing communicative intentions. Frontiers in Psychology, 8: 1465. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01465.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-F6F0-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-1A7D-5
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files
hide Files
:
Regel_2017.pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
Name:
Regel_2017.pdf
Description:
-
Visibility:
Public
MIME-Type / Checksum:
application/pdf / [MD5]
Technical Metadata:
Copyright Date:
-
Copyright Info:
-
License:
-

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Regel, Stefanie1, 2, Author              
Gunter, Thomas C.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Department of Neurocognitive Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: ERP; P600; N400; Language comprehension; Social cognition; Cueing; Pragmatics; Irony
 Abstract: How to make sure that one’s utterances are understood as intended when not facing each other? In order to convey communicative intentions, in digital communication emoticons and pragmatic cues are frequently used. Such cueing becomes even more crucial for implied interpretations (e.g., irony) that cannot be understood literally, but require extra information. Sentences, such as ‘That’s fantastic,’ may achieve either a literal or ironic meaning depending on the contextual constraints. In two experiments using event-related brain potentials (ERPs), we examined the effects of cueing communicative intentions (i.e., by means of quotation marks) on ironic and literal language comprehension. An impact of cueing on language processing was seen as early as 200 ms post-stimulus onset by the emergence of a P300 preceding a sustained positivity for cued irony relative to literal language, while for uncued irony a P200-P600 pattern was obtained. In presence of additional information for ironic intentions, pragmatic reanalysis allowing inferences on the message level may have occured immediately. Moreover, by examining the way of cueing (i.e., ambiguous vs. unambiguous cueing) this type of information for communicative intentions appeared to be only effective when the cues were unambiguous by matching pragmatic conventions. The findings suggest that cueing communicative intentions may immediately affect language comprehension, albeit depending on pragmatic conventions of the cues’ usage.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-11-122017-08-152017-09-11
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01465
PMID: 28955258
PMC: PMC5600996
Other: eCollection 2017
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 1465 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: /journals/resource/1664-1078