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  Implicit talker training improves comprehension of auditory speech in noise

Kreitewolf, J., Mathias, S. R., & von Kriegstein, K. (2017). Implicit talker training improves comprehension of auditory speech in noise. Frontiers in Psychology, 8: 1584. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01584.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-F939-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B40C-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Kreitewolf, Jens1, 2, Author              
Mathias, Samuel R.3, Author
von Kriegstein, Katharina2, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, University of Lübeck, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
3Department of Psychiatry, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Implicit training; Voice learning; Talker familiarity; Familiarity benefit; Speech comprehension; Speech-reception thresholds; Speech-in-noise task
 Abstract: Previous studies have shown that listeners are better able to understand speech when they are familiar with the talker’s voice. In most of these studies, talker familiarity was ensured by explicit voice training; that is, listeners learned to identify the familiar talkers. In the real world, however, the characteristics of familiar talkers are learned incidentally, through communication. The present study investigated whether speech comprehension benefits from implicit voice training; that is, through exposure to talkers’ voices without listeners explicitly trying to identify them. During four training sessions, listeners heard short sentences containing a single verb (e.g., “he writes”), spoken by one talker. The sentences were mixed with noise, and listeners identified the verb within each sentence while their speech-reception thresholds (SRT) were measured. In a final test session, listeners performed the same task, but this time they heard different sentences spoken by the familiar talker and three unfamiliar talkers. Familiar and unfamiliar talkers were counterbalanced across listeners. Half of the listeners performed a test session in which the four talkers were presented in separate blocks (blocked paradigm). For the other half, talkers varied randomly from trial to trial (interleaved paradigm). The results showed that listeners had lower SRT when the speech was produced by the familiar talker than the unfamiliar talkers. The type of talker presentation (blocked vs. interleaved) had no effect on this familiarity benefit. These findings suggest that listeners implicitly learn talker-specific information during a speech-comprehension task, and exploit this information to improve the comprehension of novel speech material from familiar talkers.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-05-112017-08-292017-09-14
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.01584
PMID: 28959226
PMC: PMC5603660
Other: eCollection 2017
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Funding program : Max Planck Research Group Grant
Funding organization : Max Planck Society

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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 1584 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-1078