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  Oscillatory EEG dynamics underlying automatic chunking during sentence processing

Bonhage, C., Meyer, L., Gruber, T., Friederici, A. D., & Mueller, J. L. (2017). Oscillatory EEG dynamics underlying automatic chunking during sentence processing. NeuroImage, 152, 647-657. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.03.018.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-FD84-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-5186-8
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Bonhage, Corinna1, 2, Author              
Meyer, Lars1, Author              
Gruber, Thomas3, Author
Friederici, Angela D.1, Author              
Mueller, Jutta L.1, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Department of Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Frankfurt, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, University of Osnabrück, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Institute of Cognitive Science, University of Osnabrück, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Sentences are easier to remember than random word sequences, likely because linguistic regularities facilitate chunking of words into meaningful groups. The present electroencephalography study investigated the neural oscillations modulated by this so-called sentence superiority effect during the encoding and maintenance of sentence fragments versus word lists. We hypothesized a chunking-related modulation of neural processing during the encoding and retention of sentences (i.e., sentence fragments) as compared to word lists. Time–frequency analysis revealed a two-fold oscillatory pattern for the memorization of sentences: Sentence encoding was accompanied by higher delta amplitude (4 Hz), originating both from regions processing syntax as well as semantics (bilateral superior/middle temporal regions and fusiform gyrus). Subsequent sentence retention was reflected in decreased theta (6 Hz) and beta/gamma (27–32 Hz) amplitude instead. Notably, whether participants simply read or properly memorized the sentences did not impact chunking-related activity during encoding. Therefore, we argue that the sentence superiority effect is grounded in highly automatized language processing mechanisms, which generate meaningful memory chunks irrespective of task demands.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-09-092017-03-092017-03-102017-05-15
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.03.018
PMID: 28288909
Other: Epub 2017
 Degree: -

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 152 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 647 - 657 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166