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  The right touch: Stroking of CT-innervated skin promotes vocal emotion processing

Schirmer, A., & Gunter, T. C. (2017). The right touch: Stroking of CT-innervated skin promotes vocal emotion processing. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience, 17(6), 1129-1140. doi:10.3758/s13415-017-0537-5.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-FE32-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B4E6-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Schirmer, Annett1, 2, Author              
Gunter, Thomas C.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              
2Department of Psychology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: EEG; ERP; Nonverbal; Emotion recognition; Somatosensory
 Abstract: Research has revealed a special mechanoreceptor, called C-tactile (CT) afferent, that is situated in hairy skin and that seems relevant for the processing of social touch. We pursued a possible role of this receptor in the perception of other social signals such as a person’s voice. Participants completed three sessions in which they heard surprised and neutral vocal and nonvocal sounds and detected rare sound repetitions. In a given session, participants received no touch or soft brushstrokes to the arm (CT innervated) or palm (CT free). Event-related potentials elicited to sounds revealed that stroking to the arm facilitated the integration of vocal and emotional information. The late positive potential was greater for surprised vocal relative to neutral vocal and nonvocal sounds, and this effect was greater for arm touch relative to both palm touch and no touch. Together, these results indicate that stroking to the arm facilitates the allocation of processing resources to emotional voices, thus supporting the possibility that CT stimulation benefits social perception cross-modally.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-09-202017-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3758/s13415-017-0537-5
PMID: 28933047
PMC: PMC5709431
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Funding organization : Max Planck Society

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Title: Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Cogn Affect Behav Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Austin, TX : Psychonomic Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 17 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1129 - 1140 Identifier: ISSN: 1530-7026
CoNE: /journals/resource/1530-7026