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  Motor learning in a complex balance task and associated neuroplasticity: A comparison between endurance athletes and nonathletes

Seidel, O., Carius, D., Kenville, R., & Ragert, P. (2017). Motor learning in a complex balance task and associated neuroplasticity: A comparison between endurance athletes and nonathletes. Journal of Neurophysiology, 118(3), 1849-1860. doi:10.1152/jn.00419.2017.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002D-FE41-E Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-5A30-2
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Seidel, Oliver1, 2, Author              
Carius, Daniel1, Author
Kenville, Rouven1, 2, Author              
Ragert, Patrick2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Institute of General Kinesiology and Athletics Training, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              

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Free keywords: Functional near infrared spectroscopy; Motor learning; Endurance athletes; Neuroplasticity; Balance
 Abstract: Studies suggested that motor expertise is associated with functional and structural brain alterations, which positively affect sensorimotor performance and learning capabilities. The purpose of the present study was to unravel differences in motor skill learning and associated functional neuroplasticity between endurance athletes (EA) and nonathletes (NA). For this purpose, participants had to perform a multimodal balance task (MBT) training on 2 sessions, which were separated by 1 wk. Before and after MBT training, a static balance task (SBT) had to be performed. MBT-induced functional neuroplasticity and neuromuscular alterations were assessed by means of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) and electromyography (EMG) during SBT performance. We hypothesized that EA would showed superior initial SBT performance and stronger MBT-induced improvements in SBT learning rates compared with NA. On a cortical level, we hypothesized that MBT training would lead to differential learning-dependent functional changes in motor-related brain regions [such as primary motor cortex (M1)] during SBT performance. In fact, EA showed superior initial SBT performance, whereas learning rates did not differ between groups. On a cortical level, fNIRS recordings (time × group interaction) revealed a stronger MBT-induced decrease in left M1 and inferior parietal lobe (IPL) for deoxygenated hemoglobin in EA. Even more interesting, learning rates were correlated with fNIRS changes in right M1/IPL. On the basis of these findings, we provide novel evidence for superior MBT training-induced functional neuroplasticity in highly trained athletes. Future studies should investigate these effects in different sports disciplines to strengthen previous work on experience-dependent neuroplasticity.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-06-062017-06-272017-09-012017-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1152/jn.00419.2017
PMID: 28659467
PMC: PMC5599667
Other: Epub 2017
 Degree: -

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Title: Journal of Neurophysiology
  Other : J. Neurophysiol.
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Bethesda, MD : The Society
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 118 (3) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1849 - 1860 Identifier: ISSN: 0022-3077
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925416959