English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Rapid evolution of hosts begets species diversity at the cost of intraspecific diversity

Frickel, J., Theodosiou, L., & Becks, L. (2017). Rapid evolution of hosts begets species diversity at the cost of intraspecific diversity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 114(42), 11193-11198. doi:10.1073/pnas.1701845114.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-127F-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-1280-7
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Locator:
http://www.pnas.org/content/114/42/11193 (Publisher version)
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Frickel, J.1, Author              
Theodosiou, L.1, Author              
Becks, L.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Emmy-Noether-Group Community Dynamics, Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2068285              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: eco-evolutionary dynamics; evolving community; rotifer; virus; Chlorella
 Abstract: Ecosystems are complex food webs in which multiple species interact and ecological and evolutionary processes continuously shape populations and communities. Previous studies on eco-evolutionary dynamics have shown that the presence of intraspecific diversity affects community structure and function, and that eco-evolutionary feedback dynamics can be an important driver for its maintenance. Within communities, feedbacks are, however, often indirect, and they can feed back over many generations. Here, we studied eco-evolutionary feedbacks in evolving communities over many generations and compared two-species systems (virus–host and prey–predator) with a more complex three-species system (virus–host–predator). Both indirect density- and trait-mediated effects drove the dynamics in the complex system, where host–virus coevolution facilitated coexistence of predator and virus, and where coexistence, in return, lowered intraspecific diversity of the host population. Furthermore, ecological and evolutionary dynamics were significantly altered in the three-species system compared with the two-species systems. We found that the predator slowed host–virus coevolution in the complex system and that the virus’ effect on the overall population dynamics was negligible when the three species coexisted. Overall, we show that a detailed understanding of the mechanism driving eco-evolutionary feedback dynamics is necessary for explaining trait and species diversity in communities, even in communities with only three species. © 2017, National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-02-022017-09-072017-10-17
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1701845114
BibTex Citekey: Frickel201711193
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  Other : Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the USA
  Other : Proc. Acad. Sci. USA
  Other : Proc. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
  Abbreviation : PNAS
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Washington, D.C. : National Academy of Sciences
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 114 (42) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 11193 - 11198 Identifier: ISSN: 0027-8424
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925427230