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  Recently learned foreign abstract and concrete nouns are represented in distinct cortical networks similar to the native language

Mayer, K. M., Macedonia, M., & von Kriegstein, K. (2017). Recently learned foreign abstract and concrete nouns are represented in distinct cortical networks similar to the native language. Human Brain Mapping, 38(9), 4398-4412. doi:10.1002/hbm.23668.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-23F9-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-BB07-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Mayer, Katja M.1, 2, Author              
Macedonia, Manuela1, 3, Author              
von Kriegstein, Katharina1, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Research Group Neural Mechanisms of Human Communication, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634556              
2Department of Psychology, Münster University, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Information Engineering, Johannes Kepler University, Linz, Austria, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Psychology, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Foreign vocabulary; Functional magnetic resonance imaging; Language network; Memory; Learning; Enrichment
 Abstract: In the native language, abstract and concrete nouns are represented in distinct areas of the cerebral cortex. Currently, it is unknown whether this is also the case for abstract and concrete nouns of a foreign language. Here, we taught adult native speakers of German 45 abstract and 45 concrete nouns of a foreign language. After learning the nouns for 5 days, participants performed a vocabulary translation task during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Translating abstract nouns in contrast to concrete nouns elicited responses in regions that are also responsive to abstract nouns in the native language: the left inferior frontal gyrus and the left middle and superior temporal gyri. Concrete nouns elicited larger responses in the angular gyri bilaterally and the left parahippocampal gyrus than abstract nouns. The cluster in the left angular gyrus showed psychophysiological interaction (PPI) with the left lingual gyrus. The left parahippocampal gyrus showed PPI with the posterior cingulate cortex. Similar regions have been previously found for concrete nouns in the native language. The results reveal similarities in the cortical representation of foreign language nouns with the representation of native language nouns that already occur after 5 days of vocabulary learning. Furthermore, we showed that verbal and enriched learning methods were equally suitable to teach foreign abstract and concrete nouns.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-04-142016-11-012017-05-172017-06-052017-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/hbm.23668
PMID: 28580681
Other: Epub 2017
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : KR 3735/3‐1
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : Max Planck Research Group Grant
Funding organization : Max Planck Society

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Title: Human Brain Mapping
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: New York : Wiley-Liss
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 38 (9) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 4398 - 4412 Identifier: ISSN: 1065-9471
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925601686