English
 
Help Privacy Policy Disclaimer
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
 
 
DownloadE-Mail
  Allergenic Asteraceae in air particulate matter: quantitative DNA analysis of mugwort and ragweed

Müller-Germann, I., Pickersgill, D. A., Paulsen, H., Pöschl, U., Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J., & Després, V. R. (2017). Allergenic Asteraceae in air particulate matter: quantitative DNA analysis of mugwort and ragweed. Aerobiologia. doi:10.1007/s10453-017-9485-3.

Item is

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Müller-Germann, I.1, Author              
Pickersgill, D. A.2, Author              
Paulsen, H., Author
Pöschl, U.1, Author              
Fröhlich-Nowoisky, J.1, Author              
Després, V. R.2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826290              
2Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826286              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: Mugwort (Artemisia vulgaris) and ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) are highly allergenic Asteraceae. They often cause pollen allergies in late summer and fall. While mugwort is native to Europe, ragweed reached Europe as a neophyte from North America about 150 years ago and continued spreading ever since. To understand possible relationships between the spread of ragweed, its abundance in air, and to judge possible health risks for the public, we quantified ragweed DNA in inhalable fine as well as in coarse air particulate matter. Mugwort was chosen for comparison, as it is closely related to ragweed and grows in similar, though mainly not identical, habitats but is native to Germany. The DNA quantification was performed on atmospheric aerosol samples collected over a period of 5 years in central Europe. The DNA concentrations were highest during the characteristic pollination periods but varied greatly between different years. In the inhalable fine particle fraction, ragweed exceeds the mugwort DNA concentration fivefold, while the coarse particle fraction, bearing intact pollen grains, contains more mugwort than ragweed DNA. The higher allergenic potential of ragweed might be linked to the humidity or long-range transport-induced bursting of ragweed pollen into smaller allergenic particles, which may reach the lower airways and cause more intense allergic reactions. Airborne ragweed DNA was detected also outside the local pollination periods, which can be explained by atmospheric long-range transport. Back-trajectory analyses indicate that the air masses containing ragweed DNA during winter had originated in regions with milder climate and large ragweed populations (Southern France, Carpathian Basin).

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/s10453-017-9485-3
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Aerobiologia
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Dordrecht [u.a.] : Springer Science + Business Media
Pages: 14 Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: - Identifier: Other: 0393-5965
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/0393-5965