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  Intermittent compared to continuous real-time fMRI neurofeedback boosts control over amygdala activation

Hellrung, L., Dietrich, A., Hollmann, M., Pleger, B., Kalberlah, C., Roggenhofer, E., et al. (2018). Intermittent compared to continuous real-time fMRI neurofeedback boosts control over amygdala activation. NeuroImage, 166, 198-208. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.10.031.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-24DB-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-A0FE-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Hellrung, Lydia1, 2, Author              
Dietrich, Anja1, Author              
Hollmann, Maurice1, Author              
Pleger, Burkhard1, 3, Author              
Kalberlah, Christian1, Author              
Roggenhofer, Elisabeth1, 4, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, 5, 6, 7, Author              
Horstmann, Annette1, 6, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Laboratory for Social and Neural Systems Research, Department of Economics, University of Zurich, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Neurology, University Hospital Bergmannsheil, Bochum, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University Hospital of Geneva, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
5Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Integrated Research and Treatment Center Adiposity Diseases, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
7Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Real-time fMRI; Neurofeedback; Intermittent feedback; Continuous feedback; Amygdala
 Abstract: Real-time fMRI neurofeedback is a feasible tool to learn the volitional regulation of brain activity. So far, most studies provide continuous feedback information that is presented upon every volume acquisition. Although this maximizes the temporal resolution of feedback information, it may be accompanied by some disadvantages. Participants can be distracted from the regulation task due to (1) the intrinsic delay of the hemodynamic response and associated feedback and (2) limited cognitive resources available to simultaneously evaluate feedback information and stay engaged with the task. Here, we systematically investigate differences between groups presented with different variants of feedback (continuous vs. intermittent) and a control group receiving no feedback on their ability to regulate amygdala activity using positive memories and feelings. In contrast to the feedback groups, no learning effect was observed in the group without any feedback presentation. The group receiving intermittent feedback exhibited better amygdala regulation performance when compared with the group receiving continuous feedback. Behavioural measurements show that these effects were reflected in differences in task engagement. Overall, we not only demonstrate that the presentation of feedback is a prerequisite to learn volitional control of amygdala activity but also that intermittent feedback is superior to continuous feedback presentation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-10-092017-04-102017-10-162017-10-312018-02-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.10.031
PMID: 29100939
Other: Epub 2017
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : 01EO1001
Funding program : -
Funding organization : German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF)
Project name : Obesity Mechanisms / SFB 1052
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : German Research Foundation (DFG)
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Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : FAZIT-STIFTUNG
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Konrad Adenauer Stiftung
Project name : -
Grant ID : 00014_165884
Funding program : -
Funding organization : Swiss National Science Foundation

Source 1

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 166 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 198 - 208 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166