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  Age differences in vocal emotion perception: On the role of speaker age and listener sex

Sen, A., Isaacowitz, D., & Schirmer, A. (2018). Age differences in vocal emotion perception: On the role of speaker age and listener sex. Cognition & Emotion, 32(6), 1189-1204. doi:10.1080/02699931.2017.1393399.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-2561-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-883C-1
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Sen, Antarika1, Author
Isaacowitz, Derek2, Author
Schirmer, Annett3, 4, 5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Neurobiology/Ageing Programme, Life Sciences Institute, National University of Singapore, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Psychology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Psychology, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China, ou_persistent22              
4Brain and Mind Institute, Chinese University of Hong Kong, China, ou_persistent22              
5Department Neuropsychology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634551              

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Free keywords: Prosody; Affective; Ageing; Acoustic; Motivation; Working memory; Age bias
 Abstract: Older adults have greater difficulty than younger adults perceiving vocal emotions. To better characterise this effect, we explored its relation to age differences in sensory, cognitive and emotional functioning. Additionally, we examined the role of speaker age and listener sex. Participants (N = 163) aged 19–34 years and 60–85 years categorised neutral sentences spoken by ten younger and ten older speakers with a happy, neutral, sad, or angry voice. Acoustic analyses indicated that expressions from younger and older speakers denoted the intended emotion with similar accuracy. As expected, younger participants outperformed older participants and this effect was statistically mediated by an age-related decline in both optimism and working-memory. Additionally, age differences in emotion perception were larger for younger as compared to older speakers and a better perception of younger as compared to older speakers was greater in younger as compared to older participants. Last, a female perception benefit was less pervasive in the older than the younger group. Together, these findings suggest that the role of age for emotion perception is multi-faceted. It is linked to emotional and cognitive change, to processing biases that benefit young and own-age expressions, and to the different aptitudes of women and men.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-05-032017-10-062017-10-242018-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1080/02699931.2017.1393399
PMID: 29063823
Other: Epub 2017
 Degree: -

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Title: Cognition & Emotion
  Other : Cogn. Emot.
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: London : Taylor & Francis
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 32 (6) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1189 - 1204 Identifier: ISSN: 0269-9931
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925255151