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  Identification and characterization of domesticated bacterial transposases

Bertels, F., Gallie, J., & Rainey, P. B. (2017). Identification and characterization of domesticated bacterial transposases. Genome Biology and Evolution, 9(8), 2110-2121. doi:10.1093/gbe/evx146.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-265A-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-1D00-B
Genre: Journal Article
Alternative Title : Genome Biology and Evolution

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evx146.pdf (Publisher version), 966KB
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 Creators:
Bertels, Frederic1, 2, Author              
Gallie, Jenna3, Author              
Rainey, Paul B.4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Research Group Microbial Molecular Evolution, Department Microbial Population Biology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2497692              
2Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445641              
3Research Group Microbial Evolutionary Dynamics, Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2253646              
4Department Microbial Population Biology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_2421699              

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Free keywords: Domesticated transposons, IS200, RAYTs, REPINs, Selfish genetic elements
 Abstract: Selfish genetic elements, suchas insertion sequences and transposons are found inmost genomes. Transposons are usually identifiable by their high copy number within genomes. In contrast, REP-associated tyrosine transposases (RAYTs), a recently described class of bacterial transposase, are typically present at just one copy per genome. This suggests that RAYTs no longer copy themselves and thus they no longer function as a typical transposase. Motivated by this possibility we interrogated thousands of fully sequenced bacterial genomes in order to determine patterns of RAYT diversity, their distribution across chromosomes and accessory elements, and rate of duplication.RAYTs encompass exceptionaldiversity andare divisible into at least five distinct groups. They possess featuresmore similar to housekeeping genes than insertion sequences, are predominantly vertically transmitted and have persisted through evolutionary timeto thepointwherethey arenowfoundin24%of all species forwhich at leastonefully sequencedgenomeis available.Overall, the genomic distributionof RAYTs suggests that they have been cooptedby host genomesto perform a function that benefits the host cell. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-08-022017-08-032017
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1093/gbe/evx146
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Title: Genome Biology and Evolution
  Other : Genome Biolog. Evol.
  Alternative Title : Genome Biol Evol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Oxford University Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 (8) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 2110 - 2121 Identifier: Other: 17596653 (ISSN)
n.a.: http://pubman.mpdl.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1759-6653