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  Recombination of virulence genes in divergent acidovorax avenae strains that infect a common host

Zeng, Q., Wang, J., Bertels, F., Giordano, P. R., Chilvers, M. I., Huntley, R. B., et al. (2017). Recombination of virulence genes in divergent acidovorax avenae strains that infect a common host. Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions, 30(10), 813-828. doi:10.1094/MPMI-06-17-0151-R.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-2DED-9 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-6FFA-8
Genre: Journal Article

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mpmi-06-17-0151-r(1).pdf (Publisher version), 2MB
 
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 Creators:
Zeng, Quan, Author
Wang, Jie, Author
Bertels, Frederic1, Author              
Giordano, Paul R., Author
Chilvers, Martin I., Author
Huntley, Regan B., Author
Vargas, Joseph M., Author
Sundin, George W., Author
Jacobs, Janette L., Author
Yang, Ching-Hong, Author
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1Department Evolutionary Theory, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445641              

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 Abstract: Bacterial etiolation and decline (BED), caused by Acidovorax avenae, is an emerging disease of creeping bentgrass on golf courses in the United States. We performed the first comprehensive analysis of A. avenae on a nationwide collection of turfgrass- and maize-pathogenic A. avenae. Surprisingly, our results reveal that the turfgrass-pathogenic A. avenae in North America are not only highly divergent but also belong to two distinct phylogroups. Both phylogroups specifically infect turfgrass but are more closely related to maize pathogens than to each other. This suggests that, although the disease is only recently reported, it has likely been infecting turfgrass for a long time. To identify a genetic basis for the host specificity, we searched for genes closely related among turfgrass strains but distantly related to their homologs from maize strains. We found a cluster of 11 such genes generated by three ancient recombination events within the type III secretion system (T3SS) pathogenicity island. Ever since the recombination, the cluster has been conserved by strong purifying selection, hinting at its selective importance. Together our analyses suggest that BED is an ancient disease that may owe its host specificity to a highly conserved cluster of 11 T3SS genes. © 2017 The American Phytopathological Society.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1094/MPMI-06-17-0151-R
BibTex Citekey: Zeng2017813
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Title: Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: St. Paul, MN : APS Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 30 (10) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 813 - 828 Identifier: ISSN: 0894-0282
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925558505