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  Loss of lateral prefrontal cortex control in food-directed attention and goal-directed food choice in obesity

Janssen, L., Duif, I., van Loon, I., Wegman, J., de Vries, J. H. M., Cools, R., et al. (2017). Loss of lateral prefrontal cortex control in food-directed attention and goal-directed food choice in obesity. NeuroImage, 146, 148-156. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.11.015.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-3692-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-C6A3-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Janssen, Lieneke1, Author              
Duif, Iris1, Author
van Loon, Ilke1, Author
Wegman, Joost1, Author
de Vries, Jeanne H. M.1, Author
Cools, Roshan1, Author
Aarts, Esther1, Author
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Cognitive control; Choice; Attention; Obesity; fMRI
 Abstract: Loss of lateral prefrontal cortex (lPFC)-mediated attentional control may explain the automatic tendency to eat in the face of food. Here, we investigate the neurocognitive mechanism underlying attentional bias to food words and its association with obesity using a food Stroop task. We tested 76 healthy human subjects with a wide body mass index (BMI) range (19–35 kg/m2) using fMRI. As a measure of obesity we calculated individual obesity scores based on BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio using principal component analyses. To investigate the automatic tendency to overeat directly, the same subjects performed a separate behavioral outcome devaluation task measuring the degree of goal-directed versus automatic food choices. We observed that increased obesity scores were associated with diminished lPFC responses during food attentional bias. This was accompanied by decreased goal-directed control of food choices following outcome devaluation. Together these findings suggest that deficient control of both food-directed attention and choice may contribute to obesity, particularly given our obesogenic environment with food cues everywhere, and the choice to ignore or indulge despite satiety.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2016-06-062016-11-082016-11-112017-02-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.11.015
PMID: 27845255
Other: Epub 2016
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : 016.135.023
Funding program : VENI grant
Funding organization : Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : -
Funding organization : AXA Research Fund
Project name : -
Grant ID : 220020328
Funding program : -
Funding organization : James S. McDonnell Foundation
Project name : -
Grant ID : 016.150.064
Funding program : VICI grant
Funding organization : Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO)

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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, FL : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 146 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 148 - 156 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922650166