English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Neuronal responsiveness in rat primary and secondary somatosensory cortex is differentially affected by brain state

Janssen, L. (2012). Neuronal responsiveness in rat primary and secondary somatosensory cortex is differentially affected by brain state. In Proceedings of the Master’s Programme Cognitive Neuroscience (pp. 18-31). Nijmegen, the Netherlands: Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-36CE-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-36CF-6
Genre: Conference Paper

Files

show Files

Locators

show

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Janssen, Lieneke1, Author              
Affiliations:
1External Organizations, ou_persistent22              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: Ongoing activity; Tactile processing; Barrel cortex; Secondary somatosensory cortex (SII); Gamma; Oscillations; Intracranial EEG
 Abstract: Perception and its underlying neurophysiological activity are affected by the current state of the brain. Processing of sensory input has been shown to differ with sleep, depth of anesthesia, and different levels of wakefulness (e.g. locomotion, quiet wakefulness). Along these lines, UP and DOWN states can be distinguished as two discrete, alternating states that occur during slow wave sleep and anesthesia. Recordings from single neurons and populations of neurons within cortical areas suggest that neuronal properties and network dynamics differ between these states, while they are highly similar for the UP state and wakefulness. Here we addressed the question how brain state affects tactile processing on the interregional network level. By comparing ketamine anesthesia to wakefulness and recording intracranial EEG from an epidural 32-microelectrode array overlying barrel cortex (SI) and secondary somatosensory cortex (SII) in rats (n=2), we showed that neuronal responsiveness (i.e. N1 amplitude) in SI was much larger under anesthesia as compared to wakefulness. Additionally, N1 amplitude varied highly under anesthesia and was negatively associated with prestimulus gamma power (60-100Hz). In contrast, SII was only found to be involved in tactile processing during wakefulness. This was likely due to inhibited recurrent processing between SI and SII under anesthesia, which may disrupt interaction between cortical areas while leaving thalamic input to primary sensory cortex intact. Together these preliminary findings suggest that neuronal responsiveness in SI and SII is differentially affected by the current state of the brain, reflecting the complexity of the brain’s ability to control neuronal communication effectively.

Details

show
hide
Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2012
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: -
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Proceedings of the Master’s Programme Cognitive Neuroscience
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: Nijmegen, the Netherlands : Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 18 - 31 Identifier: -