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  Intensive communicative therapy reduces symptoms of depression in chronic non-fluent aphasia

Mohr, B., Stahl, B., Berthier, M. L., & Pulvermüller, F. (2017). Intensive communicative therapy reduces symptoms of depression in chronic non-fluent aphasia. Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair, 31(12), 1053-1062. doi:10.1177/1545968317744275.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-5231-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-B539-1
Genre: Journal Article

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Mohr_Stahl_2017.pdf (Publisher version), 276KB
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 Creators:
Mohr, Bettina1, Author
Stahl, Benjamin2, 3, 4, 5, Author              
Berthier, Marcelo L.6, 7, Author
Pulvermüller, Friedemann8, 9, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Psychiatry, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Neurology, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Neurology, University Medicine of Greifswald, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Department Neurophysics (Weiskopf), MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, Leipzig, DE, ou_2205649              
5Psychologische Hochschule Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6University of Malaga, Spain, ou_persistent22              
7Cathedra ARPA of Aphasia, Malaga, Spain, ou_persistent22              
8Brain Language Laboratory, Department of Philosophy and Humanities, FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
9Berlin School of Mind and Brain, Humboldt University Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Aphasia; Depression; Communication; Neurological rehabilitation; Language therapy
 Abstract: Background. Patients with brain lesions and resultant chronic aphasia frequently suffer from depression. However, no effective interventions are available to target neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with aphasia who have severe language and communication deficits. Objective. The present study aimed to investigate the efficacy of 2 different methods of speech and language therapy in reducing symptoms of depression in aphasia on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) using secondary analysis (BILAT-1 trial). Methods. In a crossover randomized controlled trial, 18 participants with chronic nonfluent aphasia following left-hemispheric brain lesions were assigned to 2 consecutive treatments: (1) intensive language-action therapy (ILAT), emphasizing communicative language use in social interaction, and (2) intensive naming therapy (INT), an utterance-centered standard method. Patients were randomly assigned to 2 groups, receiving both treatments in counterbalanced order. Both interventions were applied for 3.5 hours daily over a period of 6 consecutive working days. Outcome measures included depression scores on the BDI and a clinical language test (Aachen Aphasia Test). Results. Patients showed a significant decrease in symptoms of depression after ILAT but not after INT, which paralleled changes on clinical language tests. Treatment-induced decreases in depression scores persisted when controlling for individual changes in language performance. Conclusions. Intensive training of behaviorally relevant verbal communication in social interaction might help reduce symptoms of depression in patients with chronic nonfluent aphasia.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-10-272017-12-012017-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/1545968317744275
PMID: 29192534
PMC: PMC5784455
Other: Epub 2017
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Project name : -
Grant ID : PU 97/15-1
Funding program : -
Funding organization : German Research Foundation (DFG)

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Title: Neurorehabilitation and Neural Repair
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Thousand Oaks, CA, USA : Sage
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 31 (12) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1053 - 1062 Identifier: ISSN: 0888-4390
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/0888-4390