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  Increased hippocampus to ventromedial prefrontal connectivity during the construction of episodic future events

Campbell, K. L., Madore, K. P., Benoit, R. G., Thakral, P. P., & Schacter, D. L. (2018). Increased hippocampus to ventromedial prefrontal connectivity during the construction of episodic future events. Hippocampus, 28(2), 76-80. doi:10.1002/hipo.22812.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-7E51-4 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-A061-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Campbell, Karen L.1, Author
Madore, Kevin P.2, Author
Benoit, Roland G.3, Author              
Thakral, Preston P.4, Author
Schacter, Daniel L.4, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Psychology, Brock University, St. Catharines, ON, Canada, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Psychology, Stanford University, CA, USA, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Research Group Adaptive Memory, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2295691              
4Department of Psychology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Dynamic causal modeling; Functional magnetic resonance imaging; Hippocampus; Imagination; Ventromedial prefrontal cortex
 Abstract: Both the hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) appear to be critical for episodic future simulation. Damage to either structure affects one's ability to remember the past and imagine the future, and both structures are commonly activated as part of a wider core network during future simulation. However, the precise role played by each of these structures and, indeed, the direction of information flow between them during episodic simulation, is still not well understood. In this study, we scanned participants using functional magnetic resonance imaging while they imagined future events in response to object cues. We then used dynamic causal modeling to examine effective connectivity between the left anterior hippocampus and vmPFC during the initial mental construction of the events. Our results show that while there is strong bidirectional intrinsic connectivity between these regions (i.e., irrespective of task conditions), only the hippocampus to vmPFC connection increases during the construction of episodic future events, suggesting that the hippocampus initiates event simulation in response to retrieval cues, driving activation in the vmPFC where episodic details may be further integrated.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-10-072017-08-022017-10-272017-11-172018-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1002/hipo.22812
PMID: 29116660
PMC: PMC5777865
Other: Epub 2017
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : MH060941
Funding program : National Institute of Mental Health Grant
Funding organization : National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Project name : -
Grant ID : -
Funding program : Tier 2 Canada Research Chair
Funding organization : Canada Research Chairs

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Title: Hippocampus
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
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Publ. Info: New York, N.Y. : Wiley-Liss, Inc.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 28 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 76 - 80 Identifier: ISSN: 1050-9631
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925593481