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  Temperature-size responses alter food chain persistence across environmental gradients

Sentis, A., Binzer, A., & Boukal, D. S. (2017). Temperature-size responses alter food chain persistence across environmental gradients. Ecology Letters, 20(7), 852-862. doi:10.1111/ele.12779.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-8213-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-8214-F
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Sentis, A.1, Author
Binzer, A.1, Author              
Boukal, D. S.1, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Evolutionary Ecology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology, Max Planck Society, ou_1445634              

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Free keywords: Body size; climate change; food web; interaction strength; paradox of enrichment; phenotypic plasticity; temperature-size rule
 Abstract: Body-size reduction is a ubiquitous response to global warming alongside changes in species phenology and distributions. However, ecological consequences of temperature-size (TS) responses for community persistence under environmental change remain largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the interactive effects of warming, enrichment, community size structure and TS responses on a three-species food chain using a temperature-dependent model with empirical parameterisation. We found that TS responses often increase community persistence, mainly by modifying consumer-resource size ratios and thereby altering interaction strengths and energetic efficiencies. However, the sign and magnitude of these effects vary with warming and enrichment levels, TS responses of constituent species, and community size structure. We predict that the consequences of TS responses are stronger in aquatic than in terrestrial ecosystems, especially when species show different TS responses. We conclude that considering the links between phenotypic plasticity, environmental drivers and species interactions is crucial to better predict global change impacts on ecosystem diversity and stability.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-12-152016-11-032017-04-032017-05-242017-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: Other: 19560
DOI: 10.1111/ele.12779
 Degree: -

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Project name : European Social Fund
Grant ID : CZ.1.07/2.3.00/30.0049
Funding program : -
Funding organization : -

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Title: Ecology Letters
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
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Publ. Info: Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 20 (7) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 852 - 862 Identifier: ISSN: 1461-023X
CoNE: /journals/resource/954925625294