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  Detection of bacteria colonizing titanium spinal implants in children.

Wagner, L., Braunschweig, L., Eiffert, H., Tsaknakis, K., Kamin, D., D'Este, E., et al. (2018). Detection of bacteria colonizing titanium spinal implants in children. Surgical Infections, 19(1), 71-77. doi:10.1089/sur.2017.185.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-001M-0000-002E-8FAA-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-C1DA-D
Genre: Journal Article

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2515192.pdf (Publisher version), 350KB
 
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 Creators:
Wagner, L., Author
Braunschweig, L., Author
Eiffert, H., Author
Tsaknakis, K., Author
Kamin, D.1, Author              
D'Este, E.1, Author              
Messer, P. K., Author
Hell, A. K., Author
Lorenz, H. M., Author
Affiliations:
1Department of NanoBiophotonics, MPI for Biophysical Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_578627              

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Free keywords: implant; infections; orthopedic infection; orthopedics; surgical site infection
 Abstract: Background: Bacterial colonization of spinal implants may cause severe complications in patients with early-onset scoliosis. Correct diagnosis and detection of microbiologic formation is crucial to prevent delayed infections caused by bacterial colonization. The purposes of this study were to estimate the rate and risk factors of colonization of vertical expandable prosthetic titanium rib (VEPTR) implants in children and to compare the different methods for detecting microbiologic formation on the spinal implants. Methods: We evaluated prospectively a group of 42 children with spinal deformities with an overall of 95 lengthening surgeries and applied different methods to detect potential bacterial colonization of VEPTR implants: swab of the implant, swab with culture of tissue, analysis of the removed lock, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and confocal microscopy. Potential risk factors were evaluated. Results: Of 42 patients, 17 (40%) were rated positive for bacterial colonization with Propionibacterium acnes and coagulase-negative staphylococci being the most commonly found bacteria. Risk factors for colonization were increasing age, body height, and weight. The swab with culture of removed tissue yielded most positive results, whereas direct microscopy and PCR were the least sensitive detection methods. Furthermore, commonly used infectious blood parameters were inconclusive. Conclusions: Although the impact of bacterial colonized implants on the health of the patients is not fully elucidated, clinicians aim for prevention of microbiologic formation on implanted devices. Therefore, reliable, inexpensive, and easy to apply diagnostic tools are indispensable to detect colonization. Based on our data, the swab together with tissue culture has the potential to become the method of choice for future diagnosis.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-11-302018-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1089/sur.2017.185
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Title: Surgical Infections
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 19 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 71 - 77 Identifier: -