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  Musical genre-dependent behavioural and EEG signatures of action planning: A comparison between classical and jazz pianists

Bianco, R., Novembre, G., Keller, P. E., Villringer, A., & Sammler, D. (2018). Musical genre-dependent behavioural and EEG signatures of action planning: A comparison between classical and jazz pianists. NeuroImage, 169, 383-394. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.12.058.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-0505-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0002-FFA5-5
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Bianco, Roberta1, 2, Author              
Novembre, Giacomo3, Author              
Keller, Peter E.4, Author
Villringer, Arno5, Author              
Sammler, Daniela1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Otto Hahn Group Neural Bases of Intonation in Speech, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_1797284              
2UCL Ear Institute, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, University College London, United Kingdom, ou_persistent22              
4The MARCS Institute, University of Western Sydney, Australia, ou_persistent22              
5Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              

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Free keywords: Plasticity; Action planning; Specialised-musical training; Event-related potentials; Oscillations
 Abstract: It is well established that musical training induces sensorimotor plasticity. However, there are remarkable differences in how musicians train for proficient stage performance. The present EEG study outlines for the first time clear-cut neurobiological differences between classical and jazz musicians at high and low levels of action planning, revealing genre-specific cognitive strategies adopted in production. Pianists imitated chord progressions without sound that were manipulated in terms of harmony and context length to assess high-level planning of sequence-structure, and in terms of the manner of playing to assess low-level parameter specification of single acts. Jazz pianists revised incongruent harmonies faster as revealed by an earlier reprogramming negativity and beta power decrease, hence neutralising response costs, albeit at the expense of a higher number of manner errors. Classical pianists in turn experienced more conflict during incongruent harmony, as shown by theta power increase, but were more ready to implement the required manner of playing, as indicated by higher accuracy and beta power decrease. These findings demonstrate that specific demands and action focus of training lead to differential weighting of hierarchical action planning. This suggests different enduring markers impressed in the brain when a musician practices one or the other style.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-12-132017-09-212017-12-182017-12-242018-04-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.12.058
PMID: 29277649
Other: Epub 2017
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 169 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 383 - 394 Identifier: ISSN: 1053-8119
CoNE: /journals/resource/954922650166