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  The systemin receptor SYR1 enhances resistance of tomato against herbivorous insects

Wang, L., Einig, E., Almeida-Trapp, M., Albert, M., Fliegmann, J., Mithöfer, A., et al. (2018). The systemin receptor SYR1 enhances resistance of tomato against herbivorous insects. Nature Plants, 4, 152-156. doi:10.1038/s41477-018-0106-0.

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Wang, Lei1, Author              
Einig, Elias, Author
Almeida-Trapp, Marilia1, Author              
Albert, Markus, Author
Fliegmann, Judith, Author
Mithöfer, Axel1, 2, Author              
Kalbacher, Hubert, Author
Felix, Georg, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Prof. Dr. W. Boland, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, ou_24028              
2Research Group Dr. A. Mithöfer, Plant Defense Physiology, Department of Bioorganic Chemistry, Prof. Dr. W. Boland, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, Jena, DE, ou_421907              

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 Abstract: The discovery in tomato of systemin, the first plant peptide hormone1,2, was a fundamental change for the concept of plant hormones. Numerous other peptides have since been shown to play regulatory roles in many aspects of the plant life, including growth, development, fertilization and interactions with symbiotic organisms3–6. Systemin, an 18 amino acid peptide derived from a larger precursor protein7, was proposed to act as the spreading signal that triggers systemic defence responses observed in plants after wounding or attack by herbivores1,7,8. Further work culminated in the identification of a leucine-rich repeat receptor kinase (LRR-RK) as the systemin receptor 160 (SR160)9,10. SR160 is a tomato homologue of Brassinosteroid Insensitive 1 (BRI1), which mediates the regulation of growth and development in response to the steroid hormone brassinolide11–13. However, a role of SR160/BRI1 as systemin receptor could not be corroborated by others14–16. Here, we demonstrate that perception of systemin depends on a pair of distinct LRR-RKs termed SYR1 and SYR2. SYR1 acts as a genuine systemin receptor that binds systemin with high affinity and specificity. Further, we show that presence of SYR1, although not decisive for local and systemic wound responses, is important for defence against insect herbivory.

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 Dates: 2018-01-102018-02-192018-03
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: Other: BOL692
DOI: 10.1038/s41477-018-0106-0
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Title: Nature Plants
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 4 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 152 - 156 Identifier: ISSN: 2055-0278
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2055-0278