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  Combinatorial codes and labeled lines: How insects use olfactory cues to find and judge food, mates and oviposition sites in complex environments

Haverkamp, A., Hansson, B. S., & Knaden, M. (2018). Combinatorial codes and labeled lines: How insects use olfactory cues to find and judge food, mates and oviposition sites in complex environments. Frontiers in Physiology, 9: 49. doi:10.3389/fphys.2018.00049.

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http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2018.00049 (Publisher version)
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 Creators:
Haverkamp, Alexander1, 2, Author              
Hansson, Bill S.1, Author              
Knaden, Markus3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Evolutionary Neuroethology, Prof. B. S. Hansson, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, ou_421894              
2IMPRS on Ecological Interactions, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, Jena, DE, ou_421900              
3Research Group Dr. M. Knaden, Insect Behavior, Department of Neuroethology, Prof. B. S. Hansson, MPI for Chemical Ecology, Max Planck Society, ou_421913              

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 Abstract: Insects, including those which provide vital ecosystems services as well as those which are devastating pests or disease vectors, locate their resources mainly based on olfaction. Understanding insect olfaction not only from a neurobiological but also from an ecological perspective is therefore crucial to balance insect control and conservation. However, among all sensory stimuli olfaction is particularly hard to grasp. Our chemical environment is made up of thousands of different compounds, which might again be detected by our nose in multiple ways. Due to this complexity, researchers have only recently begun to explore the chemosensory ecology of model organisms such as Drosophila, linking the tools of chemical ecology to those of neurogenetics. This cross-disciplinary approach has enabled several studies that range from single odors and their ecological relevance, via olfactory receptor genes and neuronal processing, up to the insects’ behavior. We learned that the insect olfactory system employs strategies of combinatorial coding to process general odors as well as labeled lines for specific compounds that call for an immediate response. These studies opened new doors to the olfactory world in which insects feed, oviposit and mate.

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 Dates: 2017-01-162018-01-182018-02
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: Other: HAN297
DOI: 10.3389/fphys.2018.00049
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Title: Frontiers in Physiology
  Other : Front. Physiol.
  Abbreviation : FPHYS
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 9 Sequence Number: 49 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-042X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1664-042X