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  Native language status of the listener modulates the neural integration of speech and iconic gestures in clear and adverse listening conditions

Drijvers, L., & Ozyurek, A. (2018). Native language status of the listener modulates the neural integration of speech and iconic gestures in clear and adverse listening conditions. Brain and Language, 177-178, 7-17. doi:10.1016/j.bandl.2018.01.003.

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Drijvers_Ozyurek_2018.pdf (Publisher version), 754KB
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 Creators:
Drijvers, Linda1, 2, 3, Author              
Ozyurek, Asli4, 5, 6, Author              
Affiliations:
1Center for Language Studies , External Organizations, ou_55238              
2International Max Planck Research School for Language Sciences, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, Nijmegen, NL, ou_1119545              
3The Communicative Brain, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, Wundtlaan 1, 6525 XD Nijmegen, NL, ou_3275695              
4Research Associates, MPI for Psycholinguistics, Max Planck Society, ou_2344700              
5Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, External Organizations, ou_55236              
6Multimodal Language and Cognition, Radboud University Nijmegen, External Organizations, ou_3055480              

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 Abstract: Native listeners neurally integrate iconic gestures with speech, which can enhance degraded speech comprehension. However, it is unknown how non-native listeners neurally integrate speech and gestures, as they might process visual semantic context differently than natives. We recorded EEG while native and highly-proficient non-native listeners watched videos of an actress uttering an action verb in clear or degraded speech, accompanied by a matching ('to drive'+driving gesture) or mismatching gesture ('to drink'+mixing gesture). Degraded speech elicited an enhanced N400 amplitude compared to clear speech in both groups, revealing an increase in neural resources needed to resolve the spoken input. A larger N400 effect was found in clear speech for non-natives compared to natives, but in degraded speech only for natives. Non-native listeners might thus process gesture more strongly than natives when speech is clear, but need more auditory cues to facilitate access to gestural semantic information when speech is degraded.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 20182018-02-272018
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.bandl.2018.01.003
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Title: Brain and Language
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Orlando, Fla. : Academic Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 177-178 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 7 - 17 Identifier: ISSN: 0093-934X
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954922647078