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  Learning New Sensorimotor Contingencies: Effects of Long-Term Use of Sensory Augmentation on the Brain and Conscious Perception

König, S., Schumann, F., Keyser, J., Goeke, C., Krause, C., Wache, S., et al. (2016). Learning New Sensorimotor Contingencies: Effects of Long-Term Use of Sensory Augmentation on the Brain and Conscious Perception. PLoS ONE, 11(12), 1-35. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0166647.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-793D-5 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-8795-E
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
König, SU, Author
Schumann, F, Author
Keyser, J, Author
Goeke, C, Author
Krause, C, Author
Wache, S, Author
Lytochkin, A, Author
Ebert, M, Author
Brunsch, V, Author
Wahn, B, Author
Kaspar, K, Author
Nagel, SK, Author
Meilinger, T1, 2, 3, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 3, 4, Author              
Wolbers, T, Author
Büchel, C, Author
König, P, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Project group: Social & Spatial Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528706              
3Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
4Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528701              

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 Abstract: Theories of embodied cognition propose that perception is shaped by sensory stimuli and by the actions of the organism. Following sensorimotor contingency theory, the mastery of lawful relations between own behavior and resulting changes in sensory signals, called sensorimotor contingencies, is constitutive of conscious perception. Sensorimotor contingency theory predicts that, after training, knowledge relating to new sensorimotor contingencies develops, leading to changes in the activation of sensorimotor systems, and concomitant changes in perception. In the present study, we spell out this hypothesis in detail and investigate whether it is possible to learn new sensorimotor contingencies by sensory augmentation. Specifically, we designed an fMRI compatible sensory augmentation device, the feelSpace belt, which gives orientation information about the direction of magnetic north via vibrotactile stimulation on the waist of participants. In a longitudinal study, participants trained with this belt for seven weeks in natural environment. Our EEG results indicate that training with the belt leads to changes in sleep architecture early in the training phase, compatible with the consolidation of procedural learning as well as increased sensorimotor processing and motor programming. The fMRI results suggest that training entails activity in sensory as well as higher motor centers and brain areas known to be involved in navigation. These neural changes are accompanied with changes in how space and the belt signal are perceived, as well as with increased trust in navigational ability. Thus, our data on physiological processes and subjective experiences are compatible with the hypothesis that new sensorimotor contingencies can be acquired using sensory augmentation.

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 Dates: 2016-12
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0166647
eDoc: e0166647
BibTex Citekey: KonigSKGKWLEBWKNMBWBK2016
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Title: PLoS ONE
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 11 (12) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1 - 35 Identifier: -