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  Action Recognition and Movement Direction Discrimination Tasks Are Associated with Different Adaptation Patterns

de la Rosa, S., Ekramnia, M., & Bülthoff, H. (2016). Action Recognition and Movement Direction Discrimination Tasks Are Associated with Different Adaptation Patterns. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 10: 56, pp. 1-6. doi:10.3389/fnhum.2016.00056.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-7A18-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-9626-B
Genre: Journal Article

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de la Rosa, S1, 2, 3, Author              
Ekramnia, M2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
3Project group: Social & Spatial Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528706              
4Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528701              

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 Abstract: The ability to discriminate between different actions is essential for action recognition and social interaction. Surprisingly previous research has often probed action recognition mechanisms with tasks that did not require participants to discriminate between actions, e.g. left-right direction discrimination tasks. It is not known to what degree visual processes in direction discrimination tasks are also involved in the discrimination of actions, e.g. when telling apart a handshake from a high-five. Here, we examined whether action discrimination is influenced by movement direction and whether direction discrimination depends on the type of action. We used an action adaptation paradigm to target action and direction discrimination specific visual processes. In separate conditions participants visually adapted to forward and backward moving handshake and high-five actions. Participants subsequently either categorized the action or the movement direction of an ambiguous action. The results showed that direction discrimination adaptation effects were modulated by the type of action but action discrimination adaptation effects were unaffected by movement direction. These results suggest that action discrimination and direction categorization rely on partly different visual information. We propose that action discrimination tasks should be considered for the exploration of visual action recognition mechanisms.

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 Dates: 2016-02
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2016.00056
BibTex Citekey: delaRosaEB2016
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Title: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
  Abbreviation : Front Hum Neurosci
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Lausanne, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 Sequence Number: 56 Start / End Page: 1 - 6 Identifier: ISSN: 1662-5161
CoNE: /journals/resource/1662-5161