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  Does the motor system contribute to action recognition in social interactions?

de la Rosa, S., Ferstl, Y., & Bülthoff, H. (2016). Does the motor system contribute to action recognition in social interactions?. Poster presented at 16th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2016), St. Pete Beach, FL, USA.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-7B26-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0005-9B0E-E
Genre: Poster

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de la Rosa, S1, 2, 3, Author              
Ferstl, Y2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
3Project group: Social & Spatial Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528706              
4Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528701              

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 Abstract: It has been suggested that the motor system is essential for various social cognitive functions including the perception of actions in social interactions. Typically, the influence of the motor system on action recognition has been addressed in studies in which participants are merely action observers. This is in stark contrast to real social interactions in which humans often execute and observe actions at the same time. To overcome this discrepancy, we investigated the contribution of the motor system to action recognition when participants concurrently observed and executed actions. As a control, participants also observed and executed actions separately (i.e. not concurrently). Specifically, we probed the sensitivity of action recognition mechanisms to motor action information in both unimodal and bimodal motor-visual adaptation conditions. We found that unimodal visual adaptation to an action changed the percept of a subsequently presented ambiguous action away from the adapted action (adaptation aftereffect). We found a similar adaptation aftereffect in the unimodal non-visual motor adaptation condition confirming that also motor action information contributes to action recognition. However, in bimodal adaptation conditions, in which participants executed and observed actions at the same time, adaptation aftereffects were governed by the visual but not motor action information. Our results demonstrate that the contribution of the motor system to action recognition is small in conditions of simultaneous action observation and execution. Because humans often concurrently execute and observe actions in social interactions, our results suggest that action recognition in social interaction is mainly based on visual action information.

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 Dates: 2016-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1167/16.12.268
BibTex Citekey: delaRosaFB2016
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Title: 16th Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society (VSS 2016)
Place of Event: St. Pete Beach, FL, USA
Start-/End Date: 2016-05-13 - 2016-05-18

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Title: Journal of Vision
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Charlottesville, VA : Scholar One, Inc.
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 16 (12) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 268 Identifier: ISSN: 1534-7362
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/111061245811050