English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Evaluating steering demands from EEG/ERP responses to task-irrelevant distraction

Chuang, L., & Scheer, M. (2016). Evaluating steering demands from EEG/ERP responses to task-irrelevant distraction. In 50. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Psychologie (DGPs 2016) (pp. 49-49).

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-7C55-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-DD70-9
Genre: Meeting Abstract

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Locator:
Link (Any fulltext)
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Chuang, L1, 2, 3, Author              
Scheer, M3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Project group: Cognition & Control in Human-Machine Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528703              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
3Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: A driver can either be voluntarily or involuntarily distracted when In a vehicle handling environment. They can voluntarily perform steering-irrelevant tasks whilst steering, or momentarily shift their attention to unexpected events. Both instances are a matter of safety-critical concern, especially with the prevalence of consumer devices that compete for limited mental resources (e.g., smartphones). Although dual-task paradigms can be employed to evaluate resource competition between steering and non-steering tasks, they cannot be feasibly implemented in operational scenarios for real-world evaluations. EEG/ERP methods provide the opportunity to do the samewithout requiring an overt response to a steering-irrelevant task. In our talk, we present two studies to show how manipulations of steering demands can influence our ability to either voluntarily or involuntarily attend to steering-irrelevant distractors. Our results show that unexpected auditory targets, which do not require responding, evoke early and late P3a as well as reorientation negativity (RON) components that are sensitive to steering demands. In particular, the amplitude of late P3a (Pz) is diminished by increases in vehicle handling complexity. The P300 amplitudes of rare auditory targets, which require a voluntary response, are diminished by increased difficulty in vehicle handling but in path trajectory complexity. The implications of these findings are discussed in the context of an ERP model of distraction that consists of three stages: detection, involuntary orientation, and reorientation.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2016-09-19
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: BibTex Citekey: ChuangS2016
 Degree: -

Event

show
hide
Title: 50. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Psychologie (DGPs 2016)
Place of Event: Leipzig, Germany
Start-/End Date: -

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: 50. Kongress der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Psychologie (DGPs 2016)
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 49 - 49 Identifier: -