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  How your actions are coupled with mine: Adaptation aftereffects indicate shared representation of complementary actions

Chang, D.-S., Fedorov, L., Giese, M., Bülthoff, H., & de la Rosa, S. (2016). How your actions are coupled with mine: Adaptation aftereffects indicate shared representation of complementary actions. Perception, 45(How your actions are coupled with mine: Adaptation aftereffects indicate shared representation of complementary actions), 267-268.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-7C7B-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-DDB5-B
Genre: Meeting Abstract

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Chang, D-S1, Author              
Fedorov, L1, 2, Author              
Giese, M2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, 3, Author              
de la Rosa, S1, 2, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
3Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528701              
4Project group: Social & Spatial Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528706              

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 Abstract: Previous research has shown that humans share numerous cognitive processes when they interact, such as representations of tasks, goals, intentions, and space. However, little is known about the perceptual representation of complementary actions, in particular actions in an interaction that are often observed together. We examined behavioral correlates of potentially shared neural representations for human actions that are visually dissimilar, but contingent from accumulated previous observations in spatiotemporal proximity. Namely, we measured visual adaptation aftereffects in 25 participants for perceiving the actions Throwing and Giving after prolonged exposure to the actions Catching and Taking, and vice versa, in a completely crossed design. We found significant adaptation aftereffects for all tested actions (p<0.001) as well as for the complementary actions. For the complementary actions, the overall adaptation aftereffect for the disambiguation of Catching from Taking was significant after prolonged exposure (adaptation) to Throwing and Giving (p<0.001), as well as for the disambiguation of Throwing from Giving when Catching and Taking were used as adaptors (p¼0.002). These results support the hypothesis that processes involved in the recognition of complementary actions might employ a shared neural representation.

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 Dates: 2016-08
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1177/0301006616671273
BibTex Citekey: ChangFGBd2016
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Title: 39th European Conference on Visual Perception (ECVP 2016)
Place of Event: Barcelona, Spain
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Title: Perception
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 45 (How your actions are coupled with mine: Adaptation aftereffects indicate shared representation of complementary actions) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 267 - 268 Identifier: -