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  Hypermetabolism in the hippocampal formation of cognitively impaired patients indicates detrimental maladaptation

Apostolova, I., Lange, C., Mäurer, A., Suppa, P., Spies, L., Grothe, M. J., et al. (2018). Hypermetabolism in the hippocampal formation of cognitively impaired patients indicates detrimental maladaptation. Neurobiology of Aging, 65, 41-50. doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.01.002.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-82D4-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-A083-3
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Apostolova, Ivayla1, 2, Author
Lange, Catharina3, Author
Mäurer, Anja4, Author
Suppa, Per5, Author
Spies, Lothar5, Author
Grothe, Michel J.6, Author
Nierhaus, Till7, 8, Author              
Fiebach, Jochen B.9, Author
Steinhagen-Thiessen, Elisabeth10, Author
Buchert, R.2, 3, Author
Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
2Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, ou_persistent22              
3Department of Nuclear Medicine, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
4Evangelisches Geriatriezentrum Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
5jung diagnostics GmbH, Hamburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Rostock, Germany, ou_persistent22              
7Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
8Center for Cognitive Neuroscience Berlin (CCNB), FU Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
9Center for Stroke Research, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
10Interdisciplinary Metabolism Center, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: Hippocampal formation; Hypermetabolism; Cognitive impairment; Dementia; Geriatric inpatients; Positron emission tomography
 Abstract: Structural deterioration and volume loss of the hippocampal formation is observed in many diseases associated with memory decline. Paradoxically, glucose metabolism of the hippocampal formation can be increased at the same time. This might be a consequence of compensatory (beneficial) or maladaptive (detrimental) mechanisms. Aim of this study was to differentiate between compensation and maladaptation by analyzing the association between glucose metabolism in the hippocampal formation measured by positron emission tomography with the glucose analogue 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose and cognitive performance as characterized by the extended Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease test battery in a sample of 87 patients (81.8 ± 5.4 years) with mild cognitive impairment or mild dementia and varying etiological diagnoses. Glucose metabolism in the hippocampal formation was negatively correlated with the performance in several cognitive subdomains, most pronounced for verbal semantic fluency, independent of overall neuronal dysfunction, presence of clinical Alzheimer's disease, and overall cognitive performance. This finding provides evidence that increased glucose metabolism in the hippocampal formation of cognitively impaired patients indicates detrimental maladaptation rather than a beneficial compensatory reaction. Excess glucose metabolism in the hippocampal formation might be a useful therapeutic target in these patients.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-12-272017-07-262018-01-072018-01-312018-05
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2018.01.002
PMID: 29407465
Other: Epub 2018
 Degree: -

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Project name : -
Grant ID : 10153407 ; 10153971 ; 10153458 ; 10153460 ; 10153461 ; 10153462 ; 10153463
Funding program : European Regional Development Fund
Funding organization : European Commission (EC)

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Title: Neurobiology of Aging
  Other : Neurobiol. Aging
Source Genre: Journal
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Affiliations:
Publ. Info: New York, NY [etc.] : Elsevier
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 65 Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 41 - 50 Identifier: ISSN: 0197-4580
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/954925491902