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  Eye movement planning on Single-Sensor-Single-Indicator displays is vulnerable to user anxiety and cognitive load

Allsop, J., Gray, R., Bülthoff, H., & Chuang, L. (2017). Eye movement planning on Single-Sensor-Single-Indicator displays is vulnerable to user anxiety and cognitive load. Journal of Eye Movement Research, 10(5): 8, pp. 1-15. doi:10.16910/jemr.10.5.8.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C266-2 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C267-1
Genre: Journal Article

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Allsop, J, Author
Gray, R, Author
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, 3, Author              
Chuang, L2, 3, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528701              
2Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
3Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
4Project group: Cognition & Control in Human-Machine Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528703              

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 Abstract: In this study, we demonstrate the effects of anxiety and cognitive load on eye movement planning in an instrument flight task adhering to a single-sensor-single-indicator data visu-alisation design philosophy. The task was performed in neutral and anxiety conditions, while a low or high cognitive load, auditory n-back task was also performed. Cognitive load led to a reduction in the number of transitions between instruments, and impaired task performance. Changes in self-reported anxiety between the neutral and anxiety conditions positively correlated with changes in the randomness of eye movements between instru-ments, but only when cognitive load was high. Taken together, the results suggest that both cognitive load and anxiety impact gaze behavior, and that these effects should be ex-plored when designing data visualization displays.

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 Dates: 2017-12
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.16910/jemr.10.5.8
BibTex Citekey: AllsopGBC2017
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Title: Journal of Eye Movement Research
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 10 (5) Sequence Number: 8 Start / End Page: 1 - 15 Identifier: -