English
 
User Manual Privacy Policy Disclaimer Contact us
  Advanced SearchBrowse

Item

ITEM ACTIONSEXPORT
  Cognitive brain responses during circadian wake-promotion: evidence for sleep-pressure-dependent hypothalamic activations

Reichert, C., Maire, M., Gabel, V., Viola, A., Götz, T., Scheffler, K., et al. (2017). Cognitive brain responses during circadian wake-promotion: evidence for sleep-pressure-dependent hypothalamic activations. Scientific Reports, 7: 5620, pp. 1-9. doi:10.1038/s41598-017-05695-1.

Item is

Basic

show hide
Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C2D9-0 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C2DA-F
Genre: Journal Article

Files

show Files

Locators

show
hide
Locator:
Link (Publisher version)
Description:
-

Creators

show
hide
 Creators:
Reichert, CF, Author
Maire, M, Author
Gabel, V, Author
Viola, AU, Author
Götz, T, Author
Scheffler, K1, 2, Author              
Klarhöfer, M, Author
Berthomier, C, Author
Strobel, W, Author
Phillips, C, Author
Salmon, E, Author
Cajochen, C, Author
Schmidt, C, Author
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Department High-Field Magnetic Resonance, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497796              

Content

show
hide
Free keywords: -
 Abstract: The two-process model of sleep-wake regulation posits that sleep-wake-dependent homeostatic processes interact with the circadian timing system to affect human behavior. The circadian timing system is fundamental to maintaining stable cognitive performance, as it counteracts growing homeostatic sleep pressure during daytime. Using magnetic resonance imaging, we explored brain responses underlying working memory performance during the time of maximal circadian wake-promotion under varying sleep pressure conditions. Circadian wake-promoting strength was derived from the ability to sleep during an evening nap. Hypothalamic BOLD activity was positively linked to circadian wake-promoting strength under normal, but not under disproportionally high or low sleep pressure levels. Furthermore, higher hypothalamic activity under normal sleep pressure levels predicted better performance under sleep loss. Our results reappraise the two-process model by revealing a homeostatic-dose-dependent association between circadian wake-promotion and cognition-related hypothalamic activity.

Details

show
hide
Language(s):
 Dates: 2017-07
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-05695-1
BibTex Citekey: ReichertMGVGSKBSPSCS2017
 Degree: -

Event

show

Legal Case

show

Project information

show

Source 1

show
hide
Title: Scientific Reports
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Affiliations:
Publ. Info: -
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 Sequence Number: 5620 Start / End Page: 1 - 9 Identifier: -