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  Cultural differences in room size perception

Saulton, A., Bülthoff, H., de la Rosa, S., & Dodds, T. (2017). Cultural differences in room size perception. PLoS One, 12(4), 1-12. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0176115.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C315-C Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-8784-1
Genre: Journal Article

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Saulton, A1, 2, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 2, 3, Author              
de la Rosa, S1, 2, 4, Author              
Dodds, TJ1, 2, 5, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
3Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528701              
4Project group: Social & Spatial Cognition, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528706              
5Research Group Space and Body Perception, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528693              

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 Abstract: Cultural differences in spatial perception have been little investigated, which gives rise to the impression that spatial cognitive processes might be universal. Contrary to this idea, we demonstrate cultural differences in spatial volume perception of computer generated rooms between Germans and South Koreans. We used a psychophysical task in which participants had to judge whether a rectangular room was larger or smaller than a square room of reference. We systematically varied the room rectangularity (depth to width aspect ratio) and the viewpoint (middle of the short wall vs. long wall) from which the room was viewed. South Koreans were significantly less biased by room rectangularity and viewpoint than their German counterparts. These results are in line with previous notions of general cognitive processing strategies being more context dependent in East Asian societies than Western ones. We point to the necessity of considering culturally-specific cognitive processing strategies in visual spatial cognition research.

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 Dates: 2017-04
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0176115
eDoc: e0176115
BibTex Citekey: SaultonBdD2017
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 (4) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1 - 12 Identifier: -