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  Attention reorganizes connectivity across networks in a frequency specific manner

Kwon, S., Watanabe, M., Fischer, E., & Bartels, A. (2017). Attention reorganizes connectivity across networks in a frequency specific manner. NeuroImage, 144(Part A), 217-226. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.10.014.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C351-8 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C352-7
Genre: Journal Article

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Kwon, S1, Author              
Watanabe, M1, 2, Author              
Fischer, E1, 3, Author              
Bartels, A1, 2, Author              
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1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
3Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              

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 Abstract: Attention allows our brain to focus its limited resources on a given task. It does so by selective modulation of neural activity and of functional connectivity (FC) across brain-wide networks. While there is extensive literature on activity changes, surprisingly few studies examined brain-wide FC modulations that can be cleanly attributed to attention compared to matched visual processing. In contrast to prior approaches, we used an ultra-long trial design that avoided transients from trial onsets, included slow fluctuations (<0.1 Hz) that carry important information on FC, and allowed for frequency-segregated analyses. We found that FC derived from long blocks had a nearly two-fold higher gain compared to FC derived from traditional (short) block designs. Second, attention enhanced intrinsic (negative or positive) correlations across networks, such as between the default-mode network (DMN), the dorsal attention network (DAN), and the visual system (VIS). In contrast attention de-correlated the intrinsically correlated visual regions. Third, the de-correlation within VIS was driven primarily by high frequencies, whereas the increase in DAN-VIS predominantly by low frequencies. These results pinpoint two fundamentally distinct effects of attention on connectivity. Information flow increases between distinct large-scale networks, and de-correlation within sensory cortex indicates decreased redundancy.

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 Dates: 2017-01
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2016.10.014
BibTex Citekey: KwonWFB2016
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Title: NeuroImage
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 144 (Part A) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 217 - 226 Identifier: -