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  Causal Inference in Multisensory Heading Estimation

de Winkel, K., Katliar, M., & Bülthoff, H. (2017). Causal Inference in Multisensory Heading Estimation. PLoS ONE, 12(1), 1-20. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0169676.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C353-6 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-8780-5
Genre: Journal Article

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de Winkel, KN1, 2, 3, Author              
Katliar, M1, 2, 3, Author              
Bülthoff, HH1, 3, 4, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Project group: Motion Perception & Simulation, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528705              
3Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
4Project group: Cybernetics Approach to Perception & Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528701              

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 Abstract: A large body of research shows that the Central Nervous System (CNS) integrates multisensory information. However, this strategy should only apply to multisensory signals that have a common cause; independent signals should be segregated. Causal Inference (CI) models account for this notion. Surprisingly, previous findings suggested that visual and inertial cues on heading of self-motion are integrated regardless of discrepancy. We hypothesized that CI does occur, but that characteristics of the motion profiles affect multisensory processing. Participants estimated heading of visual-inertial motion stimuli with several different motion profiles and a range of intersensory discrepancies. The results support the hypothesis that judgments of signal causality are included in the heading estimation process. Moreover, the data suggest a decreasing tolerance for discrepancies and an increasing reliance on visual cues for longer duration motions.

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 Dates: 2017-01
 Publication Status: Published online
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0169676
eDoc: e0169676
BibTex Citekey: deWinkelKB2017
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Title: PLoS ONE
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 12 (1) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 1 - 20 Identifier: -