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  Using EEG to understand why behavior to auditory in-vehicle notifications differs across test environments

Chuang, L., Glatz, C., & Krupenia, S. (2017). Using EEG to understand why behavior to auditory in-vehicle notifications differs across test environments. In S. Boll, B. Pfleging, B. Donmez, I. Politis, & D. Large (Eds.), 9th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications (AutomotiveUI '17) (pp. 123-133). New York, NY, USA: ACM Press.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C391-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-C392-E
Genre: Conference Paper

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 Creators:
Chuang, LL1, 2, 3, Author              
Glatz, C1, 2, 3, 4, Author              
Krupenia, S, Author
Affiliations:
1Project group: Cognition & Control in Human-Machine Systems, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528703              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
3Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
4Project group: Motion Perception & Simulation, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2528705              

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 Abstract: In this study, we employ EEG methods to clarify why auditory notifications, which were designed for task management in highly automated trucks, resulted in different performance behavior, when deployed in two different test settings: (a) student volunteers in a lab environment, (b) professional truck drivers in a realistic vehicle simulator. Behavioral data showed that professional drivers were slower and less sensitive in identifying notifications compared to their counterparts. Such differences can be difficult to interpret and frustrates the deployment of implementations from the laboratory to more realistic settings. Our EEG recordings of brain activity reveal that these differences were not due to differences in the detection and recognition of the notifications. Instead, it was due to differences in EEG activity associated with response generation. Thus, we show how measuring brain activity can deliver insights into how notifications are processed, at a finer granularity than can be afforded by behavior alone.

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 Dates: 2017-09
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
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 Rev. Method: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1145/3122986.3123017
BibTex Citekey: ChuangGK2017
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Title: 9th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications (AutomotiveUI '17)
Place of Event: Oldenburg, Germany
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Title: 9th International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications (AutomotiveUI '17)
Source Genre: Proceedings
 Creator(s):
Boll, S., Editor
Pfleging, B., Editor
Donmez, B., Editor
Politis, I., Editor
Large, D., Editor
Affiliations:
-
Publ. Info: New York, NY, USA : ACM Press
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 123 - 133 Identifier: ISBN: 978-1-4503-5150-8