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  Hydroxylamine released by nitrifying microorganisms is a precursor for HONO emission from drying soils

Ermel, M., Behrendt, T., Oswald, R., Derstroff, B., Wu, D., Hohlmann, S., et al. (2018). Hydroxylamine released by nitrifying microorganisms is a precursor for HONO emission from drying soils. Scientific Reports, 8: 1877. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-20170-1.

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 Creators:
Ermel, M.1, Author              
Behrendt, T.2, Author
Oswald, R.1, Author              
Derstroff, B.3, Author              
Wu, Dianming4, Author              
Hohlmann, S.1, Author              
Stönner, C.2, Author
Pommerening-Roeser, A.2, Author
Koenneke, M.2, Author
Williams, J.3, Author              
Meixner, F. X.1, Author              
Andreae, M. O.1, Author              
Trebs, I.2, Author
Sörgel, M.3, Author              
Affiliations:
1Biogeochemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826286              
2external, ou_persistent22              
3Atmospheric Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826285              
4Multiphase Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826290              

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 Abstract: Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important precursor of the hydroxyl radical (OH), the atmosphere ́s primary oxidant. An unknown strong daytime source of HONO is required to explain measurements in ambient air. Emissions from soils are one of the potential sources. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have been identified as possible producers of these HONO soil emissions. However, the mechanisms for production and release of HONO in soils are not fully understood. In this study, we used a dynamic soil- chamber system to provide direct evidence that gaseous emissions from nitrifying pure cultures contain hydroxylamine (NH 2 OH), which is subsequently converted to HONO in a heterogeneous reaction with water vapor on glass bead surfaces. In addition to different AOB species, we found release of HONO also in ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), suggesting that these globally abundant microbes may also contribute to the formation of atmospheric HONO and consequently OH. Since biogenic NH 2 OH is formed by diverse organisms, such as AOB, AOA, methane-oxidizing bacteria, heterotrophic nitrifiers, and fungi, we argue that HONO emission from soil is not restricted to the nitrifying bacteria, but is also promoted by nitrifying members of the domains Archaea and Eukarya .

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018
 Publication Status: Published online
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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 1877 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/2045-2322