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  Physical exercise and spatial training: A longitudinal study of effects on cognition, growth factors, and hippocampal plasticity

Woost, L., Bazin, P.-L., Taubert, M., Trampel, R., Tardif, C., Garthe, A., et al. (2018). Physical exercise and spatial training: A longitudinal study of effects on cognition, growth factors, and hippocampal plasticity. Scientific Reports, 8: 4239. doi:10.1038/s41598-018-19993-9.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-F417-3 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-0FC1-3
Genre: Journal Article

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Woost, Luise1, Author              
Bazin, Pierre-Louis2, 3, 4, Author              
Taubert, Marco1, 5, 6, Author              
Trampel, Robert2, Author              
Tardif, Christine1, 7, 8, Author              
Garthe, Alexander9, 10, Author
Kempermann, Gerd9, 10, Author
Renner, Ulrich11, Author
Stalla, Günter11, Author
Ott, Derek V. M.1, 12, Author              
Rjosk, Viola1, Author              
Obrig, Hellmuth1, 13, Author              
Villringer, Arno1, 13, 14, Author              
Roggenhofer, Elisabeth1, 15, Author              
Klein, Tilmann A.1, 13, 16, Author              
Affiliations:
1Department Neurology, MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_634549              
2Department Neurophysics (Weiskopf), MPI for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, Max Planck Society, ou_2205649              
3Social Brain Laboratory, The Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, Amsterdam, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
4Spinoza Centre for Neuroimaging, University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, ou_persistent22              
5Department of Sport Sciences, Faculty of Humanities, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
6Center for Behavioral Brain Sciences, Magdeburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
7McConnell Brain Imaging Centre, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
8Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital, McGill University, Montréal, QC, Canada, ou_persistent22              
9German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
10Center for Regenerative Therapies Dresden, TU Dresden, Germany, ou_persistent22              
11Department of Clinical Research, Max Planck Institute of Psychiatry, Munich, Germany, ou_persistent22              
12Epilepsy Center Berlin-Brandenburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              
13Clinic for Cognitive Neurology, University of Leipzig, Germany, ou_persistent22              
14Center for Stroke Research, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              
15Department of Clinical Neurosciences, University Hospital of Geneva, Switzerland, ou_persistent22              
16Institute of Psychology, Otto von Guericke University Magdeburg, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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 Abstract: Physical exercise has been suggested to improve cognitive performance through various neurobiological mechanisms, mediated by growth factors such as BDNF, IGF-I, and VEGF. Moreover, animal research has demonstrated that combined physical and cognitive stimulation leads to increased adult neurogenesis as compared to either experimental condition alone. In the present study, we therefore investigated whether a sequential combination of physical and spatial training in young, healthy adults elicits an additive effect on training and transfer gains. To this end, we compared the effects of (i) eight 20-minute sessions of cycling, (ii) sixteen 30-minute sessions of spatial training, (iii) a combination of both, and included (iv) a passive control cohort. We assessed longitudinal changes in cognitive performance, growth factor levels, and T1 relaxation of hippocampal subfields (acquired with 7 T MRI). While substantial physical and spatial training gains were elicited in all trained groups, longitudinal transfer changes did not differ between these groups. Notably, we found no evidence for an additive effect of sequential physical and spatial training. These results challenge the extrapolation from the findings reported in animals to young, healthy adults.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-09-182018-01-052018-03-09
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/s41598-018-19993-9
PMID: 29523857
PMC: PMC5844866
 Degree: -

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Title: Scientific Reports
  Abbreviation : Sci. Rep.
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: London, UK : Nature Publishing Group
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 8 Sequence Number: 4239 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2045-2322
CoNE: /journals/resource/2045-2322