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  The sound of success: Investigating cognitive and behavioral effects of motivational music in sports

Elvers, P., & Steffens, J. (2017). The sound of success: Investigating cognitive and behavioral effects of motivational music in sports. Frontiers in Psychology, 8:2026. doi:10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02026.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-F6CA-7 Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0000-F6CB-6
Genre: Journal Article

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Greb, Steffens, Schlotz-Understanding music-selection behavior.pdf (Publisher version), 428KB
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Greb, Steffens, Schlotz-Understanding music-selection behavior.pdf
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2017
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© 2017 Elvers and Steffens. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.

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 Creators:
Elvers, Paul1, Author              
Steffens, Jochen2, Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Music, Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics, Max Planck Society, ou_2421696              
2Audio Communication Group, Technische Universität Berlin, Berlin, Germany, ou_persistent22              

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Free keywords: music, motivation, self-enhancement, self-esteem, sports, risk taking, motor coordination
 Abstract: Listening to music before, during, or after sports is a common phenomenon, yet its functions and effects on performance, cognition, and behavior remain to be investigated. In this study we present a novel approach to the role of music in sports and exercise that focuses on the notion of musical self-enhancement (Elvers, 2016). We derived the following hypotheses from this framework: listening to motivational music will (i) enhance self-evaluative cognition, (ii) improve performance in a ball game, and (iii) evoke greater risk-taking behavior. To evaluate the hypotheses, we conducted a between-groups experiment (N = 150) testing the effectiveness of both an experimenter playlist and a participant-selected playlist in comparison to a no-music control condition. All participants performed a ball-throwing task developed by Decharms and Davé (1965), consisting of two parts: First, participants threw the ball from fixed distances into a funnel basket. During this task, performance was measured. In the second part, the participants themselves chose distances from the basket, which allowed their risk-taking behavior to be assessed. The results indicate that listening to motivational music led to greater risk taking but did not improve ball-throwing performance. This effect was more pronounced in male participants and among those who listened to their own playlists. Furthermore, self-selected music enhanced state self-esteem in participants who were performing well but not in those who were performing poorly. We also discuss further implications for the notion of musical self-enhancement.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017-08-142017-11-062017-11-21
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2017.02026
 Degree: -

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Title: Frontiers in Psychology
  Abbreviation : Front Psychol
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Pully, Switzerland : Frontiers Research Foundation
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 8:2026 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1664-1078
CoNE: /journals/resource/1664-1078