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  4000 years of human dietary evolution in central Germany, from the first farmers to the first elites

Münster, A., Knipper, C., Oelze, V. M., Nicklisch, N., Stecher, M., Schlenker, B., et al. (2018). 4000 years of human dietary evolution in central Germany, from the first farmers to the first elites. PLoS One, 13(3): 0194862. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0194862.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-17BF-F Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-17C0-C
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Münster, Angelina, Author
Knipper, Corina, Author
Oelze, Vicky M., Author
Nicklisch, Nicole, Author
Stecher, Marcus, Author
Schlenker, Björn, Author
Ganslmeier, Robert, Author
Fragata, Matthias, Author
Friederich, Susanne, Author
Dresely, Veit, Author
Hubensack, Vera, Author
Brandt, Guido1, Author              
Döhle, Hans-Jürgen, Author
Vach, Werner, Author
Schwarz, Ralf, Author
Metzner-Nebelsick, Carola, Author
Meller, Harald, Author
Alt, Kurt W., Author
Affiliations:
1Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              

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 Abstract: Investigation of human diet during the Neolithic has often been limited to a few archaeological cultures or single sites. In order to provide insight into the development of human food consumption and husbandry strategies, our study explores bone collagen carbon and nitrogen isotope data from 466 human and 105 faunal individuals from 26 sites in central Germany. It is the most extensive data set to date from an enclosed geographic microregion, covering 4,000 years of agricultural history from the Early Neolithic to the Early Bronze Age. The animal data show that a variety of pastures and dietary resources were explored, but that these changed remarkably little over time. In the human δ15N however we found a significant increase with time across the different archaeological cultures. This trend could be observed in all time periods and archaeological cultures (Bell Beaker phenomenon excluded), even on continuously populated sites. Since there was no such trend in faunal isotope values, we were able largely to exclude manuring as the cause of this effect. Based on the rich interdisciplinary data from this region and archaeological period we can argue that meat consumption increased with the increasing duration of farming subsistence. In δ13C, we could not observe any clear increasing or decreasing trends during the archaeological time periods, either for humans or for animals, which would have suggested significant changes in the environment and landscape use. We discovered sex-related dietary differences, with males of all archaeological periods having higher δ15N values than females, and an age-related increasing consumption of animal protein. An initial decrease of δ15N-values at the age of 1–2 years reveals partial weaning, while complete weaning took place at the age of 3–4 years.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-03-27
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 32
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0194862
Other: shh980
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Title: PLoS One
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: San Francisco, CA : Public Library of Science
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 13 (3) Sequence Number: 0194862 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 1932-6203
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/1000000000277850