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  Prefrontal cortex and dopamine single neuron spike rates and LFP phase represent time over distinct scales

Moghaddam, B., & Totah, N. K. (2014). Prefrontal cortex and dopamine single neuron spike rates and LFP phase represent time over distinct scales. Poster presented at 44th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2014), Washington, DC, USA.

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Moghaddam, B, Author
Totah, Nelson K1, 2, Author           
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1Department Physiology of Cognitive Processes, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497798              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: Expectations are generated on multiple timescales. During behavioral planning and working memory utilization, expectations are constructed on the multi-second level (sec), whereas expectations can be externally guided at the sub-second level by rhythmic stimuli (msec). Estimation of multi-second intervals has been associated with monotonic, “climbing” changes in neuron spike rate. On the other hand, sub-second expectations have been associated with rhythmic fluctuations of neuronal excitability in relation to phase of mesoscopic signals. It is not known if changes in gradual spike rate and phase-modulation of neuronal excitability co-occur during multi-second expectations. We studied this question by measuring spike rate, across-trial phase consistency, and phase locked modulations of excitation during a multi-second stimulus expectation task. We recorded single unit spiking and local field potentials from 3 rodent brain regions that have been implicated in time interval estimation, as well as in expectancy and behavioral planning: the prefrontal cortex (PFC), the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), and the dopamine-producing ventral tegmental area (VTA). A stimulus-evoked phase reset in the PFC, ACC and VTA was observed, which may allow adaptive coding by these neurons and underlie their necessity for behavioral flexibility. In contrast, intrinsic across-trial phase consistency was not observed and phase modulations of excitation did not change in a climbing pattern. These data suggest that expectation over multi-second time intervals is better represented by climbing activity of single dopamine and PFC neurons as compared to mesoscopic signal phase.

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 Dates: 2014-11-16
 Publication Status: Published in print
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Title: 44th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2014)
Place of Event: Washington, DC, USA
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Title: 44th Annual Meeting of the Society for Neuroscience (Neuroscience 2014)
Source Genre: Proceedings
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: 230.26 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -