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  Modeling Human Control of Self-Motion Direction With Optic Flow and Vestibular Motion

Zaal, P., Nieuwenhuizen, F., van Paassen, M., & Mulder, M. (2013). Modeling Human Control of Self-Motion Direction With Optic Flow and Vestibular Motion. IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics, 43(2), 544-556. doi:10.1109/TSMCB.2012.2212188.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-45AF-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-45B0-A
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Zaal, PMT, Author
Nieuwenhuizen, FM1, 2, Author              
van Paassen, MM, Author
Mulder, M, Author
Affiliations:
1Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797              
2Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794              

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 Abstract: In this paper, we investigate the effects of visual and motion stimuli on the manual control of one's direction of self-motion. In a flight simulator, subjects conducted an active target-following disturbance-rejection task, using a compensatory display. Simulating a vehicular control task, the direction of vehicular motion was shown on the outside visual display in two ways: an explicit presentation using a symbol and an implicit presentation, namely, through the focus of radial outflow that emerges from optic flow. In addition, the effects of the relative strength of congruent vestibular motion cues were investigated. The dynamic properties of human visual and vestibular motion perception paths were modeled using a control-theoretical approach. As expected, improved tracking performance was found for the configurations that explicitly showed the direction of self-motion. The human visual time delay increased with approximately 150 ms for the optic flow conditions, relative to explicit presentations. Vestibular motion, providing higher order information on the direction of self-motion, allowed subjects to partially compensate for this visual perception delay, improving performance. Parameter estimates of the operator control model show that, with vestibular motion, the visual feedback becomes stronger, indicating that operators are more confident to act on optic flow information when congruent vestibular motion cues are present.

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 Dates: 2013-04
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1109/TSMCB.2012.2212188
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Title: IEEE Transactions on Cybernetics
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: - Volume / Issue: 43 (2) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 544 - 556 Identifier: -