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  The Effect of Translational and Rotational Body-Based Information on Navigation

Ruddle, R. (2013). The Effect of Translational and Rotational Body-Based Information on Navigation. In F. Steinicke, Y. Visell, J. Campos, & A. Lécuyer (Eds.), Human Walking in Virtual Environments: Perception, Technology, and Applications (pp. 99-102). New York, NY, USA: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-1-4419-8432-6_5.

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 Creators:
Ruddle, RA1, 2, Author              
Affiliations:
1Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497794              
2Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497797              

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 Abstract: Physical locomotion provides internal (body-based) sensory information about the translational and rotational components of movement. This chapter starts by summarizing the characteristics of model-, small- and large-scale VE applications, and attributes of ecological validity that are important for the application of navigation research. The type of navigation participants performed, the scale and spatial extent of the environment, and the richness of the visual scene are used to provide a framework for a review of research into the effect of body-based information on navigation. The review resolves contradictions between previous studies’ findings, identifies types of navigation interface that are suited to different applications, and highlights areas in which further research is needed. Applications that take place in small-scale environments, where maneuvering is the most demanding aspect of navigation, will benefit from full-walking interfaces. However, collision detection may not be needed because users avoid obstacles even when they are below eye-level. Applications that involve large-scale spaces (e.g., buildings or cities) just need to provide the translational component of body-based information, because it is only in unusual scenarios that the rotational component of body-based information produces any significant benefit. This opens up the opportunity of combining linear treadmill and walking-in-place interfaces with projection displays that provide a wide field of view.

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 Dates: 2013-052013
 Publication Status: Published in print
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1007/978-1-4419-8432-6_5
 Degree: -

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Title: Human Walking in Virtual Environments: Perception, Technology, and Applications
Source Genre: Book
 Creator(s):
Steinicke, F, Editor
Visell, Y, Editor
Campos, J1, 2, Editor            
Lécuyer, A, Editor
Affiliations:
1 Department Human Perception, Cognition and Action, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, ou_1497797            
2 Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Max Planck Society, Spemannstrasse 38, 72076 Tübingen, DE, ou_1497794            
Publ. Info: New York, NY, USA : Springer
Pages: - Volume / Issue: - Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 99 - 102 Identifier: ISBN: 978-1-4419-8431-9