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  Neolithic and medieval virus genomes reveal complex evolution of Hepatitis B

Krause-Kyora, B., Susat, J., Key, F. M., Kühnert, D., Bosse, E., Immel, A., et al. (2018). Neolithic and medieval virus genomes reveal complex evolution of Hepatitis B. eLife, 7: e36666. doi:10.7554/eLife.36666.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-4E1C-A Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0003-28F4-D
Genre: Journal Article

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 Creators:
Krause-Kyora, Ben1, Author              
Susat, Julian, Author
Key, Felix M.1, Author              
Kühnert, Denise2, Author              
Bosse, Esther, Author
Immel, Alexander1, Author              
Rinne, Christoph, Author
Kornell, Sabin-Christin, Author
Yepes, Diego, Author
Franzenburg, Sören, Author
Heyne, Henrike O, Author
Meier, Thomas, Author
Lösch, Sandra, Author
Meller, Harald, Author
Friederich, Susanne, Author
Nicklisch, Nicole, Author
Alt, Kurt W, Author
Schreiber, Stefan, Author
Tholey, Andreas, Author
Herbig, Alexander1, Author              
Nebel, Almut, AuthorKrause, Johannes1, Author               more..
Affiliations:
1Archaeogenetics, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2074310              
2tide, Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, Max Planck Society, ou_2591691              

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 Abstract: The hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the most widespread human pathogens known today, yet its origin and evolutionary history are still unclear and controversial. Here, we report the analysis of three ancient HBV genomes recovered from human skeletons found at three different archaeological sites in Germany. We reconstructed two Neolithic and one medieval HBV genomes by ̑extitde novo assembly from shotgun DNA sequencing data. Additionally, we observed HBV-specific peptides using paleo-proteomics. Our results show that HBV circulates in the European population for at least 7000 years. The Neolithic HBV genomes show a high genomic similarity to each other. In a phylogenetic network, they do not group with any human-associated HBV genome and are most closely related to those infecting African non-human primates. These ancient virus forms appear to represent distinct lineages that have no close relatives today and possibly went extinct. Our results reveal the great potential of ancient DNA from human skeletons in order to study the long-time evolution of blood borne viruses.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2018-05-10
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: 20
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.7554/eLife.36666
Other: shh996
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Title: eLife
Source Genre: Journal
 Creator(s):
Locarnini, Stephen, Editor
Affiliations:
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Publ. Info: Cambridge : eLife Sciences Publications
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 7 Sequence Number: e36666 Start / End Page: - Identifier: ISSN: 2050-084X
CoNE: /journals/resource/2050-084X