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  Particulate trimethylamine in the summertime Canadian high Arctic lower troposphere

Köllner, F., Schneider, J., Willis, M. D., Klimach, T., Helleis, F., Bozem, H., et al. (2017). Particulate trimethylamine in the summertime Canadian high Arctic lower troposphere. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 17(22), 13747-13766. doi:10.5194/acp-17-13747-2017.

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 Creators:
Köllner, F.1, Author              
Schneider, J.1, Author              
Willis, Megan D.2, Author
Klimach, T.1, Author              
Helleis, F.3, Author              
Bozem, Heiko2, Author
Kunkel, Daniel2, Author
Hoor, Peter2, Author
Burkart, Julia2, Author
Leaitch, W. Richard2, Author
Aliabadi, Amir A.2, Author
Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.2, Author
Herber, Andreas B.2, Author
Borrmann, S.1, Author              
Affiliations:
1Particle Chemistry, Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826291              
2external, ou_persistent22              
3Max Planck Institute for Chemistry, Max Planck Society, ou_1826284              

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 Abstract: Size-resolved and vertical profile measurements of single particle chemical composition (sampling altitude range 50–3000 m) were conducted in July 2014 in the Canadian high Arctic during an aircraft-based measurement campaign (NETCARE 2014). We deployed the single particle laser ablation aerosol mass spectrometer ALABAMA (vacuum aerodynamic diameter range approximately 200–1000 nm) to identify different particle types and their mixing states. On the basis of the single particle analysis, we found that a significant fraction (23 %) of all analyzed particles (in total: 7412) contained trimethylamine (TMA). Two main pieces of evidence suggest that these TMA-containing particles originated from emissions within the Arctic boundary layer. First, the maximum fraction of particulate TMA occurred in the Arctic boundary layer. Second, compared to particles observed aloft, TMA particles were smaller and less oxidized. Further, air mass history analysis, associated wind data and comparison with measurements of methanesulfonic acid give evidence of a marine-biogenic influence on particulate TMA. Moreover, the external mixture of TMA-containing particles and sodium and chloride ("Na ∕ Cl-") containing particles, together with low wind speeds, suggests particulate TMA results from secondary conversion of precursor gases released by the ocean. In contrast to TMA-containing particles originating from inner-Arctic sources, particles with biomass burning markers (such as levoglucosan and potassium) showed a higher fraction at higher altitudes, indicating long-range transport as their source. Our measurements highlight the importance of natural, marine inner-Arctic sources for composition and growth of summertime Arctic aerosol.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2017
 Publication Status: Published in print
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 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Type: -
 Identifiers: ISI: 000415751900001
DOI: 10.5194/acp-17-13747-2017
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Title: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics
  Abbreviation : ACP
Source Genre: Journal
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Publ. Info: Göttingen : Copernicus Publications
Pages: - Volume / Issue: 17 (22) Sequence Number: - Start / End Page: 13747 - 13766 Identifier: ISSN: 1680-7316
CoNE: https://pure.mpg.de/cone/journals/resource/111030403014016