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  Vibrio cholerae use pili and flagella synergistically to effect motility switching and conditional surface attachment

Utada, A. S., Bennett, R. R., Fong, J. C. N., Gibiansky, M. L., Yildiz, F. H., Golestanian, R., et al. (2014). Vibrio cholerae use pili and flagella synergistically to effect motility switching and conditional surface attachment. Nature Communications, 5: 4913. doi:10.1038/ncomms5913.

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Item Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-771A-D Version Permalink: http://hdl.handle.net/21.11116/0000-0001-771B-C
Genre: Journal Article

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Utada, A. S., Author
Bennett, R. R., Author
Fong, J. C. N., Author
Gibiansky, M. L., Author
Yildiz, F. H., Author
Golestanian, Ramin1, Author              
Wong, G. C. L., Author
Affiliations:
1Department of Living Matter Physics, Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization, Max Planck Society, ou_2570692              

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 Abstract: We show that Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, use their flagella and mannose-sensitive hemagglutinin (MSHA) type IV pili synergistically to switch between two complementary motility states that together facilitate surface selection and attachment. Flagellar rotation counter-rotates the cell body, causing MSHA pili to have periodic mechanical contact with the surface for surface-skimming cells. Using tracking algorithms at 5a ‰ms resolution we observe two motility behaviours: a roaming', characterized by meandering trajectories, and a orbitinga, characterized by repetitive high-curvature orbits. We develop a hydrodynamic model showing that these phenotypes result from a nonlinear relationship between trajectory shape and frictional forces between pili and the surface: strong pili-surface interactions generate orbiting motion, increasing the local bacterial loiter time. Time-lapse imaging reveals how only orbiting mode cells can attach irreversibly and form microcolonies. These observations suggest that MSHA pili are crucial for surface selection, irreversible attachment, and ultimately microcolony formation.

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Language(s): eng - English
 Dates: 2014-09-19
 Publication Status: Published online
 Pages: -
 Publishing info: -
 Table of Contents: -
 Rev. Method: Peer
 Identifiers: DOI: 10.1038/ncomms5913
BibTex Citekey: Utada2014
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Title: Nature Communications
Source Genre: Journal
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Pages: 8 Volume / Issue: 5 Sequence Number: 4913 Start / End Page: - Identifier: -